COML591 - Theories of Nationalisms: Lineages of Literary Nat

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Theories of Nationalisms: Lineages of Literary Nat
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML591401
Course number integer
591
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
T 09:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
David J. Wallace
Description
You cannot build a wall to stop the free flow of literary and creative ideas. But in constructing narratives of national identity, states have long adopted particular texts as "foundational." Very often these texts have been epics or romances designated "medieval," that is, associated with the period in which specific vernaculars or "mother tongues" first emerged. France and Germany, for example, have long fought over who "owns" the Strasbourg oaths, or the Chanson de Roland; new editions of this epic poem, written in French but telling of Frankish (Germanic) warriors, have been produced (on both sides) every time these two countries go to war. In this course we will thus study both a range of "medieval" texts and the ways in which they have been claimed, edited, and disseminated to serve particular nationalist agendas. Particular attention will be paid to the early nineteenth century, and to the 1930s. Delicate issues arise as nations determine what their national epic needs to be. Russia, for example, needs the text known as The Song of Igor to be genuine, since it is the only Russian epic to predate the Mongol invasion. The text was discovered in 1797 and then promptly lost in Moscow's great fire of 1812; suggestions that it might have been a fake have to be handled with care in Putin's Russia. Similarly, discussing putative Mughal (Islamic) elements in so-called "Hindu epics" can also be a delicate matter. Some "uses of the medieval" have been exercised for reactionary and revisionist causes in the USA, but such use is much more extravagant east of Prague. And what, exactly, is the national epic of the USA? What, for that matter, of England? Beowulf has long been celebrated as an English Ur-text, but is set in Denmark, is full of Danes (and has been claimed for Ulster by Seamus Heaney). Malory's Morte Darthur was chosen to provide scenes for the queen's new robing room (following the fire that largely destroyed the Palace of Westminster in 1834), but Queen Victoria found the designs unacceptable: too much popery and adultery. Foundations of literary history still in force today are rooted in nineteenth-century historiography: thus we have The Cambridge History of Italian Literature and The Cambridge History of German Literature, each covering a millennium, even though political entities by the name of Italy and Germany did not exist until the later nineteenth century. What alternative ways of narrating literary history might be found? Itinerary models, which do not observe national boundaries, might be explored, and also the cultural history of watercourses, such as the Rhine, Danube, or Nile. The exact choice of texts to be
Course number only
591
Cross listings
ENGL594401, ITAL594401
Use local description
No

COML790 - Rec Issues in Crit Theor: Marx and Globality

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Rec Issues in Crit Theor: Marx and Globality
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML790401
Course number integer
790
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
graduate
Instructors
David Kazanjian
Description
Course varies with instructor.
Course number only
790
Cross listings
ENGL790401
Use local description
No

COML787 - Tpcs in Contemporary Art: Photo-Painting

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Tpcs in Contemporary Art: Photo-Painting
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML787401
Course number integer
787
Meeting times
M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Kaja Silverman
Description
Topics vary each semester. Fall 2019: "When industry erupts in the sphere of art," Baudelaire famously wrote in 1859, "it becomes the latter's mortal enemy, and in the resulting confusion of functions none is well carried out...If photography is allowed to deputize for art in some of art's activities, it will not be long before it has supplanted or corrupted art altogether...Photography must, therefore, return to its true duty, which is handmaid of the arts and sciences." History has not been kind to this argument. First, Henry Fox Talbot and many of his contemporaries attributed the photographic image to nature, not industry, and the same is true of a number of contemporary artists. Second, by 1842--three years after the official invention of photography--photographers had already begun hand-coloring their daguerreotypes, and a century and a half later Richter started smearing and spattering paint onto small photographs, and exhibiting them along with his abstract and figurative paintings. By the mid-1850's, many artists were also painting from photographs, sometimes by projecting them onto their canvases, and treating these projections as preparatory drawings. They called the resulting images photo-paintings. And although it became increasingly "disreputable" to work in this way as the century progressed,
Course number only
787
Cross listings
ARTH794401, ENGL793401
Use local description
No

COML786 - "Auto-Bio-Graphies?" Italian Models of (Self)Identifying Narrations

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
"Auto-Bio-Graphies?" Italian Models of (Self)Identifying Narrations
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML786401
Course number integer
786
Meeting times
T 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Carla Locatelli
Description
Topics vary from year to year.
Course number only
786
Cross listings
ITAL685401
Use local description
No

COML700 - Postcolonial Literature: J.M. Coetzee

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Postcolonial Literature: J.M. Coetzee
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML700401
Course number integer
700
Meeting times
R 09:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Rita Barnard
Description
An advanced seminar in anglophone African literature, possibly including a few works in translation.
Course number only
700
Cross listings
ENGL775401
Use local description
No

COML627 - South Asian Literature As Comparative Literature

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
South Asian Literature As Comparative Literature
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML627401
Course number integer
627
Meeting times
T 03:00 PM-06:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Gregory Y. Goulding
Description
The extent to which the narrative reflexes of the novel can accommodate and express the nature of human work are explored primarily in a study of two nineteenth-century writers. Eliot and Hardy. Reading for the course also includes novels and short stories of other nineteenth-century writers (Dickens, Zola, tolstoy, Stowe, Melville), and background reading on the social and philosophic theory of work.
Course number only
627
Cross listings
SAST627401
Use local description
No

COML626 - Medieval Lit in Romance-Iberian Peninsula: Castilian, Portuguese & Catalan

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Medieval Lit in Romance-Iberian Peninsula: Castilian, Portuguese & Catalan
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML626401
Course number integer
626
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
W 12:00 PM-03:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Carlos Pio
Michael Solomon
Description
A study of the tradition of "serio-comic" literature from ancient times to the present, focusing on works that combine ostensibly incompatible tones, genres, and themes to produce a particular sense of man in history. Readings include: the dialogues of Lucian, Petronius' SATYRICON, extracts from Rabelais and Boccaccio, GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, extracts from Sterne, and Gogol's DEAD SOULS. Students will be expected to attend a series of undergraduate lectures on these works; an additional hour will be scheduled in which the history and theory of menippean satire will be discussed. Special attention is given to general problems of genre theory that are raised by works that seem to challenge generic norms.
Course number only
626
Cross listings
SPAN630401
Use local description
No

COML612 - Hannah Arendt

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Hannah Arendt
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML612401
Course number integer
612
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
All Readings and Lectures in English
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
graduate
Instructors
Liliane Weissberg
Description
Within the last ten or fifteen years, there has been a flowering of scholarship revealing the diversity of oral verbal art worldwide. The course surveys a selection of recent book-length studies of specific narrative and other verbal art traditions in their cultural contexts. We will move from North Africa through the Middle East, South Asia, Australia, the western Pacific, and native America, examining particular traditions and texts, the ways they intersect with their societies, and the ways different scholars have found to document and interpret them.
Course number only
612
Cross listings
GRMN612401, JWST612401
Use local description
No

COML605 - Mod Lit Theory & Crit

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Mod Lit Theory & Crit
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML605401
Course number integer
605
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
F 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Andrea Reynaldo Goulet
Description
This course will provide an overview of major European thinkers in literary theory of the 20th and 21st centuries. We will pay particular attention to the following movements: Structuralism and Deconstruction (Levi-Strauss, Jakobson, Barthes, Derrida), Social Theory (Foucault, Ranciere), Psychoanalysis (Freud, Lacan, Abraham and Torok), Schizoanalysis (Deleuze and Guattari), Feminism and Queer Theory (Irigary, Kristeva, Sedgwick), Spatial Theory (Bachelard, DeCerteau, Lefebvre), and the Frankfurt School (Adorno and Horkheimer, Kracauer). Readings and discussion will be in English.
Course number only
605
Cross listings
ENGL605401, GRMN605401, FREN605401
Use local description
No

COML603 - Poetique Du Recit

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Poetique Du Recit
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML603401
Course number integer
603
Meeting times
T 02:00 PM-04:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Gerald J Prince
Description
Does architectural theory define architectural practice? The present seminar will explore this question in a number of ways. It will look at prominent examples of contemporary architecture and their evaluation by prize committees and architectural critics; recent theoretical work and architectural manifestoes and the practice of architectural firms; and the writings and work by architect-critics such as Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown, Daniel Libeskind, Peter Eisenman, and Peter Zumthor. In the course of our seminar, we will also reflect on the question whether architecture, a discipline that deals with an inhabitable environment, may differ in its relationship between theory and practice from other arts, such as painting or literature.
Course number only
603
Cross listings
FREN603401
Use local description
No