COML574 - Faces of Love: Gender, Sexuality, and the Erotic in Persian Literature

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Faces of Love: Gender, Sexuality, and the Erotic in Persian Literature
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML574401
Course number integer
574
Meeting times
TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili
Description
Beloved, Lover and Love are three concepts that dominate the semantic field of eroticism in Persian literature and mysticism. The interrelation among these concepts makes it almost impossible to treat any one of the concepts separately. Moreover, there exists various faces and shades of love in the works of classical and modern Persian literature that challenges the conventional heteronormative assumptions about the sexual and romantic relationships between the lover and the beloved. A sharp contrast exists between the treatment of homosexuality and queerness in Islamic law, on the one hand and its reflection in Persian literature, particularly poetry (the chief vehicle of Persian literary expression), on the other. This course introduces and explores different faces of love, eroticism and homoeroticism in the Persian literary tradition from the dawn of dawn of the Persian poetry in the ninth century all through to the twenty-first century. It offers a comprehensive study of representations and productions of heteronormativity, sexual orientation and gender roles with particular reference to the notion of love, lover and beloved in Persian literature.
Course number only
574
Cross listings
NELC290401, NELC574401, COML275401, GSWS275401, GSWS575401
Use local description
No

COML275 - Faces of Love: Gender, Sexuality and the Erotic in Persian Literature

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Faces of Love: Gender, Sexuality and the Erotic in Persian Literature
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML275401
Course number integer
275
Meeting times
TR 04:30 PM-06:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Fatemeh Shams Esmaeili
Description
Beloved, Lover and Love are three concepts that dominate the semantic field of eroticism in Persian literature and mysticism. The interrelation among these concepts makes it almost impossible to treat any one of the concepts separately. Moreover, there exists various faces and shades of love in the works of classical and modern Persian literature that challenges the conventional heteronormative assumptions about the sexual and romantic relationships between the lover and the beloved. A sharp contrast exists between the treatment of homosexuality and 'queerness' in Islamic law, on the one hand and its reflection in Persian literature, particularly poetry (the chief vehicle of Persian literary expression), on the other. This course introduces and explores different faces of love, eroticism and homoeroticism in the Persian literary tradition from the dawn of dawn of the Persian poetry in the ninth century all through to the twenty-first century. It offers a comprehensive study of representations and productions of heteronormativity, sexual orientation and gender roles with particular reference to the notion of love, lover and beloved in Persian literature.
Course number only
275
Cross listings
NELC290401, NELC574401, COML574401, GSWS275401, GSWS575401
Use local description
No

COML151 - Water Worlds

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Water Worlds
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML151401
Course number integer
151
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
Meeting times
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Simon J Richter
Description
As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we're accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar bear habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while low-lying cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges,tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. The basic question we'll be asking is: What can we learn from the humanities that will be helpful for confronting the problems and challenges caused by climate change and sea level rise?
Course number only
151
Cross listings
GRMN150401, CIMS150401, ENVS150401
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML150 - War and Representation

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
War and Representation
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML150401
Course number integer
150
Registration notes
Humanities & Social Science Sector
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Description
This class will explore complications of representing war in the 20th and 21st centuries. War poses problems of perception, knowledge, and language. The notional "fog of war" describes a disturbing discrepancy between agents and actions of war; the extreme nature of the violence of warfare tests the limits of cognition, emotion, and memory; war's traditional dependence on declaration is often warped by language games--"police action," "military intervention," "nation-building," or palpably unnamed and unacknowledged state violence. Faced with the radical uncertainty that forms of war bring, modern and contemporary authors have experimented in historically, geographically, experientially and artistically particular ways, forcing us to reconsider even seemingly basic definitions of what a war story can be. Where does a war narrative happen? On the battlefield, in the internment camp, in the suburbs, in the ocean, in the ruins of cities, in the bloodstream? Who narrates war? Soldiers, refugees, gossips, economists, witnesses, bureaucrats, survivors, children, journalists, descendants and inheritors of trauma, historians, those who were never there? How does literature respond to the rise of terrorist or ideology war, the philosophical and material consequences of biological and cyber wars, the role of the nuclear state? How does the problem of war and representation disturb the difference between fiction and non-fiction? How do utilitarian practices of representation--propaganda, nationalist messaging, memorialization, xenophobic depiction--affect the approaches we use to study art? Finally, is it possible to read a narrative barely touched or merely contextualized by war and attend to the question of war's shaping influence? The class will concentrate on literary objects--short stories, and graphic novels--as well as film and television. Students of every level and major are welcome in and encouraged to join this class, regardless of literary experience.
Course number only
150
Use local description
No

COML530 - Pre-Modern Rhetorics

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Pre-Modern Rhetorics
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML530401
Course number integer
530
Registration notes
For PhD Students Only
Meeting times
T 12:00 PM-03:00 PM
Level
graduate
Instructors
Rita Copeland
Description
This course offers an overview of the ancient, medieval, and early modern rhetorical traditions, and aims to work very broadly across cultural and textual histories. It should be useful for any students working in early and later periods (including post-Renaissance) who want a grounding in the intellectual and institutional history of rhetoric, the "discourse about discourse" that was central to curricular formation, aesthetics, politics, ideas of history, and ideas of cannons. We will read materials from sophistic rhetoric, from Plato and Aristotle, from Cicero, Quintilian, and rhetorical theoriests from late antiquity (including Augustine); we will work through medieval materials from monastic and cathedral schools to the universities, considering how Ciceronian rhetoric carries an overwhelming influence into Middle Ages; we will consider the professional stratification of various kinds of rhetorical production and theory in the late Middle Ages and look at some crucial literary embodiments of rhetoric as disciplinary force.
Course number only
530
Cross listings
CLST530401, ENGL707401
Use local description
No

COML369 - Literary Translation

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Literary Translation
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML369401
Course number integer
369
Meeting times
TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Emily R. C. Wilson
Description
This course is for graduate students and undergraduates with permission of the instructor. All students enrolled must have knowledge of at least one language other than English. We will study the history, theory and practice of literary translation, and participate in it. Readings will include theoretical works in translation studies, using selections from Lawrence Venuti's Translation Studies Reader and Schulte/Biguenet's Translation Theory Reader, with some supplemental readings; we will also look at comparative cases of multiple translations of the same original, and analyze how different translators make different interpretative/formal/aesthetic choices. Course assignments will include both a research paper, on the history and/or theory of translation, and an extended practical translation exercise, to be workshopped over the course of the semester, consisting of a literary translation of a text of the student's choice.
Course number only
369
Cross listings
CLST569401, CLST369401
Use local description
No

COML105 - Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Sex and Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML105401
Course number integer
105
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Emily R. C. Wilson
Description
What is being a man, being a woman, being masculine, being feminine, being neither, being both? Is sex about pleasure, domination, identity, reproduction, or something else? Are sexual orientation and gender identity innate? How can words, myths and stories inform cultural assumptions about sex and gender? Did people in ancient times have a concept of sexuality? How do gendered English terms (like "girly", "effeminate", or "feisty") compare to gendered ancient Greek and Latin terms, like virtus, which connotes both "virtue" and "masculinity"? Why did the Roman and English speaking worlds have to borrow the word "clitoris" from the ancient Greeks? How did people in antiquity understand consent? Can we ever get access to the perspectives of ancient women? In this introductory undergraduate course, we will learn about sex and gender in ancient Greece and Rome. We will discuss similarities and differences between ancient and modern attitudes, and we will consider how ancient texts, ancient art, ancient ideas and ancient history have informed modern western discussions, assumptions and legislation. Our main readings will be of ancient texts, all in English translation; authors studied will include Ovid, Aristophanes, Plato, Euripides, and Sappho. Class requirements will include participation in discussion as well as quizzes, reading responses, and a final exam.
Course number only
105
Cross listings
CLST101401, GSWS104401
Use local description
No

COML070 - Latina/O Literature: Latina/O Literature: Latinx Cultural Studies

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Latina/O Literature: Latina/O Literature: Latinx Cultural Studies
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML070401
Course number integer
70
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Jennifer Sternad Ponce De Leon
Description
This course offers a broad introduction to the study of Latina/o/x culture. We will examine literature, theater, visual art, and popular cultural forms, including murals, poster art, graffiti, guerrilla urban interventions, novels, poetry, short stories, and film. In each instance, we will study this work within its historical context and with close attention to the ways it illuminates class formation, racialization, and ideologies of gender and sexuality as they shape Latino/a/xs' experience in the U.S. Topics addressed in the course will include immigration and border policy, revolutionary nationalism and its critique, anti-imperialist thought, Latinx feminisms, queer latinidades, ideology, identity formation, and social movements. While we will address key texts, historical events, and intellectual currents from the late 19th century and early 20th century, the course will focus primarily on literature and art from the 1960s to the present. All texts will be in English.
Course number only
070
Cross listings
LALS060401, GSWS060401, ENGL070401
Use local description
No

COML124 - World Film Hist '45-Pres

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
World Film Hist '45-Pres
Term session
2
Term
2019B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
920
Section ID
COML124920
Course number integer
124
Meeting times
TR 05:30 PM-09:20 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Peter Lesnik
Course number only
124
Cross listings
ARTH109920, CIMS102920
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML123 - World Film Hist To 1945

Status
C
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
910
Title (text only)
World Film Hist To 1945
Term session
1
Term
2019B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
910
Section ID
COML123910
Course number integer
123
Meeting times
TR 05:30 PM-09:20 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Peter Lesnik
Description
This course surveys the history of world film from cinema s precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
Course number only
123
Cross listings
ARTH108910, ENGL091910, CIMS101910
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No