COML269 - Fascist Cinemas

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
405
Title (text only)
Fascist Cinemas
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
405
Section ID
COML269405
Course number integer
269
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 01:00 PM-02:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
Course number only
269
Cross listings
ITAL257405, GRMN257405, CIMS257405
Use local description
No

COML269 - Fascist Cinemas

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
404
Title (text only)
Fascist Cinemas
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
404
Section ID
COML269404
Course number integer
269
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 12:00 PM-01:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
Course number only
269
Cross listings
ITAL257404, GRMN257404, CIMS257404
Use local description
No

COML269 - Fascist Cinemas

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
403
Title (text only)
Fascist Cinemas
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
403
Section ID
COML269403
Course number integer
269
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
Course number only
269
Cross listings
ITAL257403, GRMN257403, CIMS257403
Use local description
No

COML269 - Fascist Cinemas

Status
O
Activity
REC
Section number integer
402
Title (text only)
Fascist Cinemas
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
402
Section ID
COML269402
Course number integer
269
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
F 10:00 AM-11:00 AM
Level
undergraduate
Description
Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
Course number only
269
Cross listings
ITAL257402, GRMN257402, CIMS257402
Use local description
No

COML269 - Fascist Cinemas

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Fascist Cinemas
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML269401
Course number integer
269
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
All Readings and Lectures in English
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
Meeting times
MW 11:00 AM-12:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Catriona Macleod
Description
Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
Course number only
269
Cross listings
ITAL257401, CIMS257401, GRMN257401
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML266 - The Israeli Short Story Reinvented

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
The Israeli Short Story Reinvented
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML266401
Course number integer
266
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
R 04:30 PM-07:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Nili Rachel Scharf Gold
Description
The objective of this course is to develop an artistic appreciation for literature through in-depth class discussions and text analysis. Readings are comprised of Israeli poetry and short stories. Students examine how literary language expresses psychological and cultural realms. The course covers topics such as: the short story reinvented, literature and identity, and others. Because the content of this course changes from year to year, students may take it for credit more than once. This course is conducted in Hebrew and all readings are in Hebrew.Grading is based primarily on participation and students' literary understanding.
Course number only
266
Cross listings
NELC259401, NELC559401, JWST259401
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML246 - Arab Women & War

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Arab Women & War
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML246401
Course number integer
246
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Huda J. Fakhreddine
Description
This course is a study of modern Arabic literary forms in the context of the major political and social changes which shaped Arab history in the first half of the twentieth century. The aim of the course is to introduce students to key samples of modern Arabic literature which trace major social and political developments in Arab society. Each time the class will be offered with a focus on one of the literary genres which emerged or flourished in the twentieth century: the free verse poem, the prose-poem, drama, the novel, and the short story. We will study each of these emergent genres against the socio-political backdrop which informed it. All readings will be in English translations. The class will also draw attention to the politics of translation as a reading and representational lens.
Course number only
246
Cross listings
NELC231401
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML245 - Study of A Theme: Intro To Psychoanalysis

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Study of A Theme: Intro To Psychoanalysis
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML245401
Course number integer
245
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
MW 05:00 PM-06:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Susan C. Adelman
Max Cavitch
Description
This is an introduction to literary study through the works of a compelling literary theme. (For offerings in a given semester, please see the on-line course descriptions on the English Department website). The theme's function within specific historical contexts, within literary history generally, and within contemporary culture, are likely to be emphasized.
Course number only
245
Cross listings
ENGL102401
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML237 - Berlin: History, Politics, Culture

Status
X
Activity
REC
Section number integer
405
Title (text only)
Berlin: History, Politics, Culture
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
405
Section ID
COML237405
Course number integer
237
Registration notes
All Readings and Lectures in English
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Description
What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, its transformation into an industrial city in the late nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structre, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we wil ready literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin. Indeed, Berlin will be a specific example to explore German history and cultural life of the last 300 years.
Course number only
237
Cross listings
URBS237405, ARTH237405, HIST237405, GRMN237405
Use local description
No

COML237 - Berlin: History, Politics, Culture

Status
X
Activity
REC
Section number integer
404
Title (text only)
Berlin: History, Politics, Culture
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
404
Section ID
COML237404
Course number integer
237
Registration notes
All Readings and Lectures in English
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Description
What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, its transformation into an industrial city in the late nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structre, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we wil ready literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin. Indeed, Berlin will be a specific example to explore German history and cultural life of the last 300 years.
Course number only
237
Cross listings
URBS237404, ARTH237404, HIST237404, GRMN237404
Use local description
No