Biological Chemistry seminar: Karim-Jean Armache, New York University

Thu, 2018-12-06 15:00
Speaker: 

Karim-Jean Armache

New York University School of Medicine

 

"Mechanistic studies of gene silencing complexes"

 

Gene silencing is conserved from yeast to humans, playing a crucial function in establishment, maintenance and propagation of distinct patterns of gene expression. This process plays an essential role in development and its dysregulation can cause diseases including cancer. In all eukaryotes, regulation of gene activity is directed by packaging of DNA into chromatin. The fundamental repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome that comprises ~146 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. The nucleosome is the platform upon which proteins and protein complexes assemble to regulate chromosomal transactions such as gene transcription. These complexes act in part by modifying and/or binding to specific histone modifications. We use biochemical, biophysical and structural approaches to understand the detailed mechanisms of gene silencing complexes, their interplay with posttranslational modifications of histones and their effect on higher-order chromatin structure.

Location: 

Carolyn Hoff Lynch Room

Biological Chemistry seminar: Abhinav Nath, University of Washington

Thu, 2018-11-01 15:00
Location: 

Carolyn Hoff Lynch Room

Topic: Protein molecular dynamics and health

Host: Dr. Elizabeth Rhoades

Biological Chemistry seminar: Kabirul Islam, University of Pittsburgh

Thu, 2018-10-18 15:00
Location: 

Carolyn Hoff Lynch Room

"Protein and small molecule engineering towards an orthogonal chromatin landscape"

Host: Dr. E. James Petersson

Biological Chemistry seminar: Sua Myong, Johns Hopkins University

Thu, 2018-10-11 15:00
Location: 
Carolyn Hoff Lynch Room

"Defective RNA interaction leads to aberrant phase separation of ALS-linked mutant FUS"

Inorganic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. David Goldberg, Johns Hopkins University

Tue, 2019-02-26 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 
Dr. David Goldberg
Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Tomson

Title & Abstract TBA

inquires rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Andrew McNally, Colorado State University

Mon, 2018-11-12 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Andrew McNally

Title: Selective Functionalization of Pyridines, Diazine and Pharmaceuticals via Heterocyclic Phosphonium Salts
Abstract: Selective methods that can functionalize electron-deficient heterocycles are in great demand due to their prevalence in biologically active compounds. Pyridines and diazines, in particular, are widespread components of pharmaceutical compounds yet methods to transform these motifs into valuable derivatives are still greatly sought after. We will present a selection of catalytic and non-catalytic methods using  phosphorus intermediates that enable multiple new bond-constructions on these heterocycles. A particular emphasis will be placed on phosphorus ligand-coupling reactions that represent an alternative means to form C–C and C-Heteroatom bonds.
Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Attached Document: 

Host: Dr. Walsh

inquires rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Inorganic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Amy Prieto, Colorado State University

Tue, 2018-10-16 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Amy Prieto

Title "Inexpensive, Efficient Approaches for Energy Production and Storage"

 

 We are interested in developing new synthetic methods for nanoscale materials with applications in energy conversion and storage. For this talk, I will focus first on using photovoltaic devices to produce energy, and in particular the synthesis and characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoparticles. The structure-property relationships for these particles can be significantly modified as the metal and chalcogen stoichiometries are tuned.  Second, I’ll discuss our efforts to develop new architectures for rechargeable Li-ion batteries for storing that energy. We are working to incorporate high surface area structures of a novel anode material into a new battery architecture wherein the current collector is conformally coated with an electrolyte made by electrochemical deposition, then surrounded by the cathode electrode. The significant advantage is that the diffusion length for Li+ between the cathode and anode will be dramatically reduced, which should lead to much faster charging rates. The general theme between both topics is the development of new synthetic methods for useful materials with an eye toward non-toxic, earth abundant chemicals and reasonable manufacturing methods.

 

 

M. C. Schulze, R. K. Schulze, A. L. Prieto "Electrodeposited thin-film CuxSb anodes for Li-ion batteries: Enhancement of cycle life via tuning of film composition and engineering of the film-substrate interface" J. Mater. Chem. A20186, 12708-12717.


 

M. Braun, L. Korala, J.  M. Kephart, and A. L. Prieto, “Synthetic Control of Quinary Nanocrystals of a Photovoltaic Material: The Clear Role of Chalcogen Ratio on Light Absorption and Charge Transport for Cu2ZnSn(S1-xSex)4”, ACS Appl. Energy Mater.2018 1(3), 1053-1059.


 

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr Goldberg

inquires rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Physical Chemistry Seminar, Dr. Sanat Kumar, Columbia University

Thu, 2018-10-11 13:00 - 14:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Sanat Kumar

"Polymer-Grafted Nanoparticle Membranes with Controllable Free-Volume"

 

-Polymer based membranes play a key role in several industrially important gas separation technologies, e.g., removing CO2 from natural gas, with enormous economic and environmental impact. Baker advocates the development of novel membrane architectures since current, pure polymer membranes only offer limited systematic pathways for improvement. Here, we develop a novel hybrid membrane construct comprised entirely of nanoparticles grafted with polymers. These membranes are shown to have broadly tunable separation performance through variations in graft density and chain length. Computer simulations show that the optimal NP packing forces the grafted polymer layer to distort, yielding regions of measurably lower polymer density. Multiple experimental probes confirm that these materials have the predicted increase in “polymer free volume”, which explains their improved separation performance. These polymer-grafted NP materials thus represent a new template for rationally designing membranes with desirable separation abilities, coupled with improved aging characteristics in the glassy state and enhanced mechanical behavior.
Location: 
Carol Lynch Lecture Hall Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Fakhraai

 

inquires rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

 

Shanna-Lee Thomas

Photo: 
First Name: 
Shanna-Lee
Last Name: 
Thomas
Official Title: 
Grants Coordinator
Contact Information
Office Location: 
Room 124, 1973 Building
Email: 
shat@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
215-573-4801

Physical Chemistry Seminar, Dr. Paul Wennberg, Caltech

Thu, 2019-02-07 13:00 - 14:00
Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Lester

Title & Abstract TBA

Inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Department of Chemistry

231 S. 34 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323

215.898.8317 voice | 215.573.2112 fax | web@chem.upenn.edu

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