Joe Francisco Joins Penn

Joseph Francisco has joined Penn as the President's Distinguished Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences. Prof. Francisco will have a secondary appointment in the Chemistry Department. 

 

Joseph S. Francisco

Photo: 
First Name: 
Joseph S.
Last Name: 
Francisco
Official Title: 
President’s Distinguished Professor
Additional Titles: 
Professor of Chemistry
Professor of Earth & Environmental Sciences
Contact Information
Email: 
frjoseph@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
215-573-3164
Education: 

B.S.: Chemistry, University of Texas at Austin, 1977

 

Ph.D.: Chemical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1983.

 

Research Fellow: University of Cambridge, 1983-1985

 

Provost Postdoctoral Fellow: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1985-1986

Research Interests: 

Research in our laboratory focuses on basic studies in spectroscopy, kinetics and photochemistry of novel transient species in the gas phase, in aerosol and at the ice-quasi liquid layer. These species play an important role in atmospheric processes. Yet questions dealing with how structures correlate to reactivity and photochemical mechanisms have not been addressed for these systems. These problems are addressed by research efforts in our laboratory. Specific research areas of interest are: 1) Spectroscopic determinations of electronic and vibrational transitions in free radicals; 2) Kinetics of individual gas-phase reaction steps involving free radicals in complex reaction mechanisms involved in the gas phase and at interfaces; 3) Characteristics of primary photo chemical processes that free radicals can undergo in the gas phase and at interfaces; 4) Atmospheric chemistry and dynamics at the air/water interface chemistry; and 5) Atmospheric chemistry and dynamics at the ice-quasi liquid layer.

 

 

Our goal is to use state-of-the-art molecular orbital methods to predict properties that can be used as a guide in the experimental search. We aim to predict spectroscopic properties for these novel species in the gas phase and at the air/water interface, that would facilitate their full experimental characterization. 

Selected Publications: 

M. Kumar, and J.S. Francisco, Mechanistic Insight into Ion-Pair Particle Formation from Methanesulfonic Acid-Amines Chemistry at the Air-Water Interface,  Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 114, 12401-12406 (2017).

 

L. Artiglia, J. Edebeli,  F. Orlando, S. Chen, P. C. Arroyo, A. Gilgen, T. Bartels-Rausch, A. Kleibert, M. Vazdar, M. A. Garegnano, J.S. Francisco,  P.B. Shepson, I. Gladich, and M. Ammann, A Surface-Stabilized Ozonide Triggers Bromide Oxidation at the Aqueous Solution-Vapor Interface, Nature Communications8, 700 (2017).

 

C.Q. Zhu, J. Zhong, M. Kumar, J.S. Francisco, X.C. Zeng, New Mechanistic Pathways for Creigee-Water Chemistry at the Air/Water Interface,  J. Am. Chem. Soc., 138, 11164-11169 (2016).

 

R. Hoehn, M.A. Carignano, S. Kais,  J.S. Francisco, and  I. Gladich, Hydrogen Bonding and Orientation Effects on the Accommodation of Methylamine at the Air-Water Interface, J. Chem. Phys.144, 214701 (2016).

 

M. Kumar, A. Sinha, and J. S. Francisco, Role of Double Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions in Atmospheric Chemistry, Acc. Chem. Res., 49, 877- 833 (2016).

 

M. Kumar and J.S. Francisco, Red-Light Induced Decomposition of Organic Peroxy Radical: A New Source of the HO2Radical, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.54, 15711-15714 (2015).

 

J.M. Anglada, M. Martins-Costa, M.F. Ruiz-Lopez, J.S. Francisco, Spectroscopic Signatures of Ozone at the Air/Water Interface and Photochemistry Implications, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA., 111, 11618-11623 (2014).

Karen Goldberg Elected to National Academy

Karen Goldberg, the Vagelos Professor of Energy Research, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Prof. Goldberg joined Penn in 2017 from the University of Washington, where she was the Nicole A. Boand Endowed Professor in Chemistry. She received her A.B. degree from Barnard College, Columbia University and her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Physical Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Josh Vura- Weis, University of Illinois

Thu, 2019-01-17 13:00 - 14:00
Speaker: 
Dr. Josh Vura-Weis
Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Title "What did the metal know, and when did she know it? Ultrafast XUV 

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Jennifer Roizen, Duke

Mon, 2019-04-22 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Jennifer Roizen

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Molander

Title & Abstract TBA

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Semianr: Dr. Maciej Walczak, University of Colorado

Mon, 2019-01-14 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Maciej Walczak

University of Colorado Boulder

 

 Next-generation tools for the synthesis of small molecules and biologics

 

The Walczak group studies methods to prepare and manipulate complex natural products and biologics such as (oligo)saccharides, peptides, and proteins. Our current interests are focused on the synthesis and chemical biology of mammalian and bacterial glycans that are known to engage in biological recognition and signaling events and show a promising therapeutic and diagnostic potential. While chemical synthesis has enabled a better understanding of the role of saccharides in homeostatic and developmental processes, key obstacles such as suboptimal selectivities in chemical glycosylation reactions await broadly applicable solutions. In this presentation, I will describe the development of metal-catalyzed methods that capitalize on stereoretentive reactions of anomeric nucleophiles suitable for the formation of C(sp3)-C and C(sp3)-heteroatom bonds. This seminar will also feature selected applications of the glycosyl cross-coupling method, mechanistic and computational studies that guided new reaction discovery, and integration with modern automation technologies.

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Huryn

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Dave Stuart, Portland State University

Mon, 2018-12-03 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. David Stuart

 

 

Title: Chemical Synthesis with Diaryliodonium Salts

Abstract: Aromatic rings are ubiquitous in molecules used in health, agriculture, technology, and energy fields.  Over the past decade, diaryliodonium salts have emerged as novel aryl-transfer reagents in both metal-catalyzed and metal-free reactions.  Our research is focused on using unsymmetrical aryl(auxiliary)iodonium salts in metal-free reactions and addressing key questions of chemoselectivity in aryl transfer.  Two competing pathways will be discussed: extrusion of arynes and direct ipso-substitution.  These pathways are exploited in the development of methods that access new chemical space and expand beyond the limitations of classic SNAr.

Bio: Dave obtained his BSc (Honors) from the University of Victoria (Victoria, BC, Canada) in 2005 and his PhD at the University of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON, Canada) in 2010 under the guidance of Prof. Keith Fagnou.  After an NSERC-funded postdoc with Eric Jacobsen (Harvard), Dave began his independent career at Portland State University in 2012.  He was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure in 2018.

 

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Molander

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Steve Malcolmson, Duke

Mon, 2018-11-05 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Steve Malcolmson

 

 

New Strategies for the Catalytic Enantioselective Synthesis of Chiral Amines and Other Challenging Scaffolds

The development of new methods for the stereoselective synthesis of chiral amines is a compelling objective in organic synthesis as these structures are found in a large number of biologically active compounds.  Yet many amine motifs remain difficult to prepare in an efficient manner, especially through complexity-building carbon–carbon bond-forming reactions and/or in atom economical ways.  In this lecture, I will describe our work in two areas of enantioselective catalysis to prepare chiral amines: 1) carbon–carbon bond formations via electrophilic additions to 2-azadienes, which act as enamine umpolung reagents, and 2) nucleophilic additions of aliphatic amines and anilines to acyclic 1,3-dienes and enynes (hydroamination).

In the former area, Cu-catalyzed reductive couplings of azadienes—virtually unexplored reagents—with ketones and imines has enabled the synthesis of challenging, sterically congested vicinal amino alcohols and diamines, while Pd-catalyzed fluoro-arylation of difluoroazadienes has permitted access to alpha-trifluoromethyl benzylic amines.  In the latter, the development of a family of electron deficient Pd–PHOX catalysts for hydrofunctionalization has enabled regio- and enantioselective addition of highly Lewis basic amines to dienes, furnishing allylic amines with a variety of allylic and olefin substituents.  Hydroaminations of enynes has led to the isolation of chiral di- and trisubstituted allenes.  Extension to diene hydroalkylation with beta-dicarbonyl-like pronucleophiles delivers myriad unsaturated carbonyl products in atom economical carbon–carbon bond-forming transformations.

 

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Walsh

 

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Steve Zimmerman, University of Illinois

Mon, 2018-11-19 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Steve Zimmerman

 

 

New Approaches to Drug Discovery and Delivery: From Cell-Penetrating Synthetic Oligomers to Organic Synthesis Within Cells

 

A major unsolved problem in medicinal chemistry is how to get large molecules (MW >500) into cells. Cell permeability is a particularly important problem when the target is polyvalent because oligo- or polyvalent drugs invariably have large sizes and molecular weights easily in excess of 1000 and diffuse very slowly across membranes. We have been developing oligovalent therapeutic agents to target the repeating DNA and RNA sequences that cause myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). This talk will describe those efforts and in particular the two approaches to get comparatively large agents into cells. The first involves polymeric metal-based catalysts that in a very broad sense mimic metalloenzymes. The ultimate goal is to have these nanoscale materials build larger, more active therapeutic agents within living cells. The water-soluble, polymeric nanoparticles we have developed use substrate binding to accelerate organic reactions and protect the metal from the competitive environment of the cell. Performing organic synthesis in the complex environment of a living cell is especially challenging. The second approach is to create inherently cell-permeable oligomeric agents. Progress on each of the above topics will be presented.

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Attached Document: 

Host: Winkler

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Jeremy May, University of Houston

Mon, 2018-10-15 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Jeremy May

 

"Synthetic Discoveries from Polycyclic Natural Products"


"In  the  pursuit  of  the  synthesis  of  biologically  active  natural  products (compounds  originally  isolated  from  natural  sources),  powerful  reactions  using organic or acid catalysts (i.e., not transition metal based) have been developed. The   new   chemical   transformations   thus   made   available,   along   with   the extraordinary  chemical  compatibility  the  new  catalysts  provide,  have  enabled access to a variety of new target motifs for synthesis. Increased understanding of the catalytic mechanism and of the role of each reaction component have also led  to  additional  applications  of  the  mechanistic  paradigm  to  new  chemical"
"transformations that utilize other classes of catalysts."

 

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Attached Document: 

Host: Dr. Chenoweth

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Department of Chemistry

231 S. 34 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323

215.898.8317 voice | 215.573.2112 fax | web@chem.upenn.edu

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