COML576 - War and Experience: 20th-Century Italian Narratives

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
War and Experience: 20th-Century Italian Narratives
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML576401
Course number integer
576
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
T 01:30 PM-03:30 PM
Meeting location
WILL 516
Level
graduate
Instructors
Paola Gambarota
Course number only
576
Cross listings
ITAL584401, CIMS584401
Use local description
No

COML562 - Public Enviro Humanities: Public Environmental Humanities

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Public Enviro Humanities: Public Environmental Humanities
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML562401
Course number integer
562
Registration notes
Permission Needed From Instructor
All Readings and Lectures in English
Meeting times
W 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
Meeting location
WILL 28
Level
graduate
Instructors
Bethany Wiggin
Description
This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment.
Course number only
562
Cross listings
ANTH543401, URBS544401, GRMN544401
Use local description
No

COML552 - Transalpine Tensions: Franco-Italian Rivalries in the Renaissance

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Transalpine Tensions: Franco-Italian Rivalries in the Renaissance
Term
2019A
Syllabus URL
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML552401
Course number integer
552
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
W 04:00 PM-06:00 PM
Meeting location
VANP 627
Level
graduate
Instructors
Scott M. Francis
Eva Del Soldato
Description
In the Middle Ages and Early Modern period, France and the Italian States were bound together by linguistic, economic, political, and religious ties, and intellectual developments never flowed unilaterally from one country to the other. On the contrary, they were transnational phenomena, and French and Italian thinkers and writers conceived of themselves and their work both in relation to and in opposition to one another. This course will consider the most fundamental aspects of Franco-Italian cultural exchange in the medieval and early modern period, with an emphasis on humanism, philosophical and religious debates, political struggles, and the rise of vernacular languages in literary and learned discourse. Authors to be studied include Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Ficino, Pico della Mirandola Castiglione, Bembo, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Du Bellay, Machiavelli, and Montaigne. In addition to learning the material covered in the course, students will gain expertise in producing professional presentations and research papers, and will also have the opportunity to consult original material from the Kislak Center. This course is open to undergraduates with permission of the instructors. It counts toward the undergraduate minor in Global Medieval Studies and the graduate certificate in Global and Medieval Renaissance Studies.
Course number only
552
Cross listings
ITAL541401, FREN541401
Use local description
No

COML533 - Dante & New Developments in Medieval Italian Narrative

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Dante & New Developments in Medieval Italian Narrative
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML533401
Course number integer
533
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
graduate
Instructors
Kevin Brownlee
Description
"Divine Comedy" in the context of Dante's medieval worldview and culture.
Course number only
533
Cross listings
ITAL531401
Use local description
No

COML519 - Translating Literature

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Translating Literature
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML519401
Course number integer
519
Registration notes
Undergraduates Need Permission
All Readings and Lectures in English
Meeting times
R 03:00 PM-05:00 PM
Meeting location
WILL 205
Level
graduate
Instructors
Kathryn Ann Hellerstein
Course number only
519
Cross listings
GRMN537401, JWST537401
Use local description
No

COML512 - Wom/Cult/Mediev/Mod/Eur: Women Writers, Manuscript Culture, Networks: Europe (1300-1700)

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
301
Title (text only)
Wom/Cult/Mediev/Mod/Eur: Women Writers, Manuscript Culture, Networks: Europe (1300-1700)
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
301
Section ID
COML512301
Course number integer
512
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
graduate
Instructors
Petronella Stoop
Description
Women were important and active players in the literary field in Medieval and early Modern Europe. Many women throughout the continent and on the British Isles engaged in the book culture, as readers, owners, commissioners, copyists, illuminators, and authors. This course intends to study the role women had in the intellectual and literary culture of their time. Starting from a number of key publications on gender, agency and female literacy and authorship in the medieval and early modern period, we will examine what texts women wrote, to which genres they had access, and what the (literary) agency of female writers was. We will explore the options women had to express their experiences, ideas, opinions and feelings and their interaction with male supervisors (in case of religious women) or male colleagues. What impressions do we get of their intellectual and literary skills? How did women writers publish their works and for whom did they write? We will also study the networks and literary circles in which women participated. Sometimes these networks were local; sometimes literature for and by women circulated through all Euopre. In our travel through time and space between c. 1300 and 1700, we will explore several literary genres and meet famous and less famous women such as Hadewijch of Brabant, Marguerite Porete, Theresa van Avila, Christine de Pizan, Anna Bijns, Mary Sidney, Anna Maria van Schurman, and Margaret Cavendish, and their contemporaries. A strong emphasis in this course will lie on the women's texts and the manuscripts in which these have been preserved, in order to shed light on the role of women in the handwritten book culture. In this way we will explore how women, religious and secular, came to the fore in medieval and early modern literary culture. In order to get an impression of the material aspects of the books women produced, read and/or owned, we will visit some of the importnat manuscript collections in Philadelphia.
Course number only
512
Use local description
No

COML396 - History Literary Crit

Status
C
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
History Literary Crit
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML396401
Course number integer
396
Registration notes
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
Meeting times
TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM
Meeting location
DRLB 3N6
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Rita Copeland
Description
This is a course on the history of literary theory, a survey of major debates about literature, poetics, and ideas about what literary texts should do, from ancient Greece to examples of modern European thought. The first half of the course will focus on early periods: Greek and Roman antiquity, especially Plato and Aristotle; the medieval period (including St. Augustine, Dante, and Boccaccio), and the early modern period (such as Philip Sidney and Giambattista Vico). In the second half of the course we will turn to modern concerns by looking at the literary (or "art") theories of some major philosophers and theorists: Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, and Walter Benjamin. We end the course in the mid-twentieth century. The purpose driving this course is to consider closely how this tradition generated questions that are still with us, such as: what is the act of interpretation; what is the "aesthetic"; what is "imitation" or mimesis; and how are we to know an author's intention. During the semester there will be four short writing assignments in the form of analytical essays (3 pages each). Students may use these small essays to build into a long piece of writing on a single text or group of texts at the end of the term. Most of our readings will come from a published anthology of literary criticism and theory; a few readings will be on Canvas.
Course number only
396
Cross listings
ENGL396401, CLST396401
Use local description
No

COML333 - Dante's Divine Comedy

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Dante's Divine Comedy
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML333401
Course number integer
333
Registration notes
Benjamin Franklin Seminars
Meeting times
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Meeting location
WILL 215
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Eva Del Soldato
Description
In this course we will read the Inferno, the Purgatorio and the Paradiso, focusing on a series of interrelated problems raised by the poem: authority, fiction, history, politics and language. Particular attention will be given to how the Commedia presents itself as Dante's autobiography, and to how the autobiographical narrative serves as a unifying thread for this supremely rich literary text. Supplementary readings will include Virgil's Aeneid and selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses. All readings and written work will be in English. Italian or Italian Studies credit will require reading Italian texts in the original language and writing about their themes in Italian. This course may be taken for graduate credit, but additional work and meetings with the instructor will be required.
Course number only
333
Cross listings
ENGL323401, ITAL333401
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

COML322 - Sexuality, Terrorism, and Human Rights

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Sexuality, Terrorism, and Human Rights
Term
2019A
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML322401
Course number integer
322
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Kirk John Fiereck
Description
How do sex and gender become sites of cultural production, identity-formation, and contentious politics? This seminar engages these questions in the context of the "Middle East" as a constructed geopolitical space for imperial politics and political intervention. The class is divided into three units. In the first unit, we engage feminist and queer theories to discuss the shifting meanings of "sex" and "gender" in transnational and postcolonial contexts. In the second unit we explore the contextual and shifting notions of "private" and "public" as they have been elaborated in political theory, feminist theory, and media studies. We also consider how different media technologies enable and constrain the performance and expression of gender and sexual identities. In the last unit, we examine the material and symbolic construction of sex and gender in the shadow of Orientalism, the War on Terror, Multiculturalism, and the recent Arab uprisings. In this unit, we consider how geopolitics are refracted in public controversies around issues like gay rights, female genital mutilation, the veil, and honor killing.
Course number only
322
Cross listings
GSWS322401, SOCI322401
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

COML299 - Cinema and Media

Status
X
Activity
REC
Section number integer
403
Title (text only)
Cinema and Media
Term
2019A
Syllabus URL
Subject area
COML
Section number only
403
Section ID
COML299403
Course number integer
299
Registration notes
Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Ramey Elizabeth Mize
Description
This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be a weekly film screening for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mid-term; 1 final project.
Course number only
299
Cross listings
ARTH295403, ENGL305403, CIMS305403, GSWS295403
Use local description
No