COML099 - Television and New Media

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Television and New Media
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML099401
Course number integer
99
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
M 02:00 PM-05:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Rahul Mukherjee
Description
As a complex cultural product, television lends itself to a variety of critical approaches that build-on, parallel, or depart from film studies. This introductory course in television studies begins with an overview of the medium's history and explores how technical and industrial changes correspond to developing conventions of genre, programming, and aesthetics. Along the way, we analyze key concepts and theoretical debates that shaped the field. In particular, we will focus on approaches to textual analysis in combination with industry research, and critical engagements with the political, social and cultural dimensions of television as popular culture.
Course number only
099
Cross listings
CIMS103401, ARTH107401, ENGL078401
Use local description
No

COML094 - Intro Literary Theory

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Intro Literary Theory
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML094401
Course number integer
94
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
S. Pearl Brilmyer
Description
This course introduces students to major issues in the history of literary theory. Treating the work of Plato and Aristotle as well as contemporary criticism, we will consider the fundamental issues that arise from representation, making meaning, appropriation and adaptation, categorization and genre, historicity and genealogy, and historicity and temporality. We will consider major movements in the history of theory including the "New" Criticism of the 1920's and 30's, structuralism and post-structuralism, Marxism and psychoanalysis, feminism, cultural studies, critical race theory, and queer theory. See the Comparative Literature website at http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/complit/ for a description of the current offerings.
Course number only
094
Cross listings
ENGL094401
Use local description
No

COML090 - Gender,Sexuality & Lit: Writing Women:1660-1760

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Gender,Sexuality & Lit: Writing Women:1660-1760
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML090401
Course number integer
90
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Toni Bowers
Description
This course will focus on questions of gender difference and of sexual desire in a range of literary works, paying special attention to works by women and treatments of same-sex desire. More fundamentally, the course will introduce students to questions about the relation between identity and representation. We will attend in particular to intersections between gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation, and will choose from a rich vein of authors: Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, Mary Shelley, Lord Byron, the Brontes, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Oscar Wilde, Henry James, Gertrude Stein, Zora Neale Hurston, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, Nella Larsen, Radclyffe Hall, Willa Cather, Elizabeth Bishop, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, Sylvia Plath, Bessie Head, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, Cherr�e Moraga, Toni Morrison, Michael Cunningham, Dorothy Allison, Jeanette Winterson, and Leslie Feinberg.
Course number only
090
Cross listings
ENGL090401, GSWS090401
Use local description
No

COML012 - India's Literature

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
India's Literature
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML012401
Course number integer
12
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Meeting times
MW 02:00 PM-03:30 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Gregory Y. Goulding
Description
This course introduces students to the extraordinary quality of literary production during the past four millennia of South Asian civilization. We will read texts in translation from all parts of South Asia up to the sixteenth century. We will read selections from hymns, lyric poems, epics, wisdom literature, plays, political works, and religious texts.
Course number only
012
Cross listings
SAST004401
Use local description
No

COML002 - Approaches Literary Std

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Approaches Literary Std
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML002401
Course number integer
2
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Communication Within the Curriculum
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Description
This course will introduce students to an exciting topic at the intersection of literature and cultural representation, taught by a young scholar at the cutting edge of the field. Requirements will include a number of oral presentations, and students will learn how to communicate clearly, thoughtfully and effectively on complex material.
Course number only
002
Cross listings
AFRC003401, ENGL002401
Use local description
No

COML001 - Approaches To Genre

Status
X
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
401
Title (text only)
Approaches To Genre
Term
2019C
Subject area
COML
Section number only
401
Section ID
COML001401
Course number integer
1
Registration notes
Course is available to Freshmen and Upperclassmen.
Communication Within the Curriculum
Meeting times
CANCELED
Level
undergraduate
Description
This course will introduce students to an exciting topic at the intersection of literature and cultural representation taught by young scholars at the cutting edge of the field. Requirements will include a number of oral presentations, and students will learn how to communicate clearly, thoughtfully and effectively on complex material.
Course number only
001
Cross listings
ENGL001401
Use local description
No

COML208 - Sicily On Page & Screen

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
Sicily On Page & Screen
Term session
2
Term
2019B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
920
Section ID
COML208920
Course number integer
208
Meeting times
MW 05:30 PM-09:20 PM
Level
undergraduate
Description
What images come to mind when we hear the words Sicily and Sicilians? Often our thoughts range from scenic vacation spots, delicious seafood and cannoli, and sweet grandmothers dressed in black, to mafia violence, vendettas, and the deep-rooted code of silence, omerta. But, how did these ideas get to us? Is there truth in them? Is there more to this island and its people? Through careful analysis of literary and cinematic representations of this Italian region, and those that do and have inhabited it, we will trace and analyze how Sicilians have represented themselves, how mainland Italians have interpreted Sicilian culture, how outsiders have understood these symbols, how our own perceptions shaped what we thought we knew about this place and, finally, how our own observations will have evolved throughout our studies. We will watch films such as Tornatore's Cinema paradiso and Coppola's The Godfather II, and read texts such as Lampedusa's The Leopard and Maraini's Bagheria. This course aims to increase students' understanding and knowledge of the Sicilian socio-cultural system. It will help students develop their ability to understand and interpret Sicilian culture through close analysis of its history, values, attitudes, and experiences, thereby allowing them to better recognize and examine the values and practices that define their own, as well as others', cultural frameworks.
Course number only
208
Cross listings
ITAL205920, CIMS204920, ENGL083920
Fulfills
Cross Cultural Analysis
Use local description
No

COML191 - World Literature: Utopias and Dystopias

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
910
Title (text only)
World Literature: Utopias and Dystopias
Term session
1
Term
2019B
Syllabus URL
Subject area
COML
Section number only
910
Section ID
COML191910
Course number integer
191
Meeting times
TR 05:30 PM-09:20 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Augusta Atinuke Irele
Description
How do we think 'the world' as such? Globalizing economic paradigms encourage one model that, while it connects distant regions with the ease of a finger-tap, also homogenizes the world, manufacturing patterns of sameness behind simulations of diversity. Our current world-political situation encourages another model, in which fundamental differences are held to warrant the consolidation of borders between Us and Them, "our world" and "theirs." This course begins with the proposal that there are other ways to encounter the world, that are politically compelling, ethically important, and personally enriching--and that the study of literature can help tease out these new paths. Through the idea of World Literature, this course introduces students to the appreciation and critical analysis of literary texts, with the aim of navigating calls for universality or particularity (and perhaps both) in fiction and film. "World literature" here refers not merely to the usual definition of "books written in places other than the US and Europe, "but any form of cultural production that explores and pushes at the limits of a particular world, that steps between and beyond worlds, or that heralds the coming of new worlds still within us, waiting to be born. And though, as we read and discuss our texts, we will glide about in space and time from the inner landscape of a private mind to the reaches of the farthest galaxies, knowledge of languages other than English will not be required, and neither will any prior familiary with the literary humanities. In the company of drunken kings, botanical witches, ambisexual alien lifeforms, and storytellers who've lost their voice, we will reflect on, and collectively navigate, our encounters with the faraway and the familiar--and thus train to think through the challenges of concepts such as translation, narrative, and ideology. Texts include Kazuo Ishiguro, Ursula K. LeGuin, Salman Rushdie, Werner Herzog, Jamaica Kincaid, Russell Hoban, Hiroshi Teshigahara, Arundhathi Roy, and Abbas Kiarostami.
Course number only
191
Cross listings
CLST191910, ENGL277910
Use local description
No

COML127 - Freaks, Creeps & Cheats

Status
O
Activity
SEM
Section number integer
920
Title (text only)
Freaks, Creeps & Cheats
Term session
2
Term
2019B
Syllabus URL
Subject area
COML
Section number only
920
Section ID
COML127920
Course number integer
127
Meeting times
TR 05:30 PM-09:20 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Cory Austin Knudson
Description
The object of this course is to analyze representations of adultery, cheating, and "perverted" or non-normative sexualities in literature and film. We will study how sex and sexual desire is represented, and think critically about the narrative conventions used for describing taboo desires and behaviors, and the social values that inform them. The themes of desire, transgression, suspicion and discovery lie at the heart of many classic narratives in drama, literature and film, from antiquity to the present. Is there anything special, we will ask, about representing sex, especially "wrong" kinds of sex? What might these stories teach us about the way we read in general? Along the way, the course will also provide an introduction to the study of sexuality and queer studies, as well as training in critical reading and cultural analysis. By supplementing classic literary accounts by authors such as Shakespeare, Pushkin, Flaubert, Chekhov, Bataille, de Sade, Proust with films by such figures as Fellini and Pasolini, we will analyze the possibilities and limitations of the different genres and forms under discussion, including novels, films, short stories, and drama. What can these forms show us (or not show us) about desire, gender, family and social obligation? We will apply a range of critical approaches to place these narratives of "bad" or "kinky" or "sinful" sexuality in a social and literary context, including formal analyses of narrative and style, feminist criticism, Marxist and sociological analyses of the family, and psychoanalytic understandings of desire and family life.
Course number only
127
Cross listings
CIMS125920, GSWS125920, RUSS125920
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No

COML125 - Narrative Across Cultures

Status
O
Activity
LEC
Section number integer
900
Title (text only)
Narrative Across Cultures
Term
2019B
Subject area
COML
Section number only
900
Section ID
COML125900
Course number integer
125
Meeting times
R 05:00 PM-08:50 PM
Level
undergraduate
Instructors
Kaushik Ramu
Description
The purpose of this course is to present a variety of narrative genres and to discuss and illustrate the modes whereby they can be analyzed. We will be looking at shorter types of narrative: short stories, novellas, and fables, and also some extracts from longer works such as autobiographies. While some works will come from the Anglo-American tradition, a larger number will be selected from European and non-Western cultural traditions and from earlier time-periods. The course will thus offer ample opportunity for the exploration of the translation of cultural values in a comparative perspective.
Course number only
125
Cross listings
SAST124900, ENGL103900, FOLK125900, NELC180900
Fulfills
Arts & Letters Sector
Use local description
No