Organic

Novartis Lectures (Julien Papillon, Novartis & Anna Pyle, Yale University)

Thu, 2018-11-29 14:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Julien Papillon

Novartis

 

Prof. Anna Pyle

Yale University

Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall
Attached Document: 

Organic Reactions Lecture (Dirk Trauner, NYU)

Mon, 2018-10-29 16:00 - 17:00
Speaker: 

Prof. Dirk Trauner

New York University

Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall

Drawing Inspiration from Nature’s Reactions and Receptors

Trost Lecture (Reza Ghadiri, Scripps)

Mon, 2018-10-08 16:00
Speaker: 

Prof. M. Reza Ghadiri

Scripps Research Institute

Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall
Attached Document: 

Toward Novel Therapeutics via Directed Remodeling of the Gut Microbiome

2018 Joullie Lecture (Dale Boger, Scripps)

Wed, 2018-09-12 16:00
Speaker: 
Prof. Dale Boger, Scripps Research Institute
Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall
"Redesign of Vancomycin for Resistant Bacteria"

Organic Chemistry Seminar, Dr. Kallol Basu, Merck

Mon, 2019-02-18 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Kallol Basu

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Smith

Title & Abstract; TBA

inquires rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Andrew McNally, Colorado State University

Mon, 2018-11-12 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Andrew McNally

Title: Selective Functionalization of Pyridines, Diazine and Pharmaceuticals via Heterocyclic Phosphonium Salts
Abstract: Selective methods that can functionalize electron-deficient heterocycles are in great demand due to their prevalence in biologically active compounds. Pyridines and diazines, in particular, are widespread components of pharmaceutical compounds yet methods to transform these motifs into valuable derivatives are still greatly sought after. We will present a selection of catalytic and non-catalytic methods using  phosphorus intermediates that enable multiple new bond-constructions on these heterocycles. A particular emphasis will be placed on phosphorus ligand-coupling reactions that represent an alternative means to form C–C and C-Heteroatom bonds.
Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Attached Document: 

Host: Dr. Walsh

inquires rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. David Nagib, Ohio State University

Mon, 2018-12-10 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. David Naglib

C-H and C-O functionalization via radical chaperones

 


Our research is focused on harnessing the untapped reactivity of abundant chemical feedstocks to enable late-stage functionalization of medicinally relevant molecules. We have recently developed new approaches for selective C-H and C-O functionalization of alcohols, amines, and carbonyls, using a combination of radical (1e-) and closed shell (2e-) processes that act in concert with one another. These radical chaperone strategies have enabled discovery of new classes of reactivity to streamline the synthesis of complex molecules with biological and industrial significance.

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lectrue Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Walsh

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Jennifer Roizen, Duke

Mon, 2019-04-22 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Jennifer Roizen

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Molander

Title & Abstract TBA

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Semianr: Dr. Maciej Walczak, University of Colorado

Mon, 2019-01-14 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Maciej Walczak

University of Colorado Boulder

 

 Next-generation tools for the synthesis of small molecules and biologics

 

The Walczak group studies methods to prepare and manipulate complex natural products and biologics such as (oligo)saccharides, peptides, and proteins. Our current interests are focused on the synthesis and chemical biology of mammalian and bacterial glycans that are known to engage in biological recognition and signaling events and show a promising therapeutic and diagnostic potential. While chemical synthesis has enabled a better understanding of the role of saccharides in homeostatic and developmental processes, key obstacles such as suboptimal selectivities in chemical glycosylation reactions await broadly applicable solutions. In this presentation, I will describe the development of metal-catalyzed methods that capitalize on stereoretentive reactions of anomeric nucleophiles suitable for the formation of C(sp3)-C and C(sp3)-heteroatom bonds. This seminar will also feature selected applications of the glycosyl cross-coupling method, mechanistic and computational studies that guided new reaction discovery, and integration with modern automation technologies.

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Huryn

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Organic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Dave Stuart, Portland State University

Mon, 2018-12-03 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. David Stuart

 

 

Title: Chemical Synthesis with Diaryliodonium Salts

Abstract: Aromatic rings are ubiquitous in molecules used in health, agriculture, technology, and energy fields.  Over the past decade, diaryliodonium salts have emerged as novel aryl-transfer reagents in both metal-catalyzed and metal-free reactions.  Our research is focused on using unsymmetrical aryl(auxiliary)iodonium salts in metal-free reactions and addressing key questions of chemoselectivity in aryl transfer.  Two competing pathways will be discussed: extrusion of arynes and direct ipso-substitution.  These pathways are exploited in the development of methods that access new chemical space and expand beyond the limitations of classic SNAr.

Bio: Dave obtained his BSc (Honors) from the University of Victoria (Victoria, BC, Canada) in 2005 and his PhD at the University of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON, Canada) in 2010 under the guidance of Prof. Keith Fagnou.  After an NSERC-funded postdoc with Eric Jacobsen (Harvard), Dave began his independent career at Portland State University in 2012.  He was promoted to Associate Professor with tenure in 2018.

 

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Molander

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Department of Chemistry

231 S. 34 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323

215.898.8317 voice | 215.573.2112 fax | web@chem.upenn.edu

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