Materials Chemistry

Special Seminar: Emilia Huerta-Sanchez, University of California, Berkeley

Mon, 2013-01-28 10:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Emilia Huerta-Sanchez

University of California, Berkeley

 

Detecting and characterizing natural selection from next generation sequencing data

 

Host: Charles Epstein (Math)

Location: 

Lynch Lecture Hall

 

Special Seminar: Sharon Aviran, University of California, Berkeley

Thu, 2013-01-24 10:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Sharon Aviran

University of California, Berkeley

 

High-throughput RNA structure analysis from chemical footprinting experiments

 

Host: Randy Kamien (Physics)

Location: 

Lynch Lecture Hall

 

New regulatory roles continue to emerge for both natural and engineered RNAs, many of which have specific structures essential to their function. This highlights a growing need to develop technologies that enable rapid and accurate characterization of structural features within complex RNA populations. Yet, available techniques that are reliable are also vastly limited by technological constraints, while the accuracy of popular computational methods is generally poor. These limitations thus pose a major barrier to comprehensive determination of structure from sequence.

Special Seminar: Kirill Korolev, MIT

Tue, 2013-01-22 10:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Kirill Korolev

Massachusetts Institute of Chemistry

 

The interplay between ecology and evolution in cancerous tumors and expanding populations

 

Host: Andrea Liu

Location: 

Lynch Lecture Hall

 

Special Seminar: Eleni Katifori, MPI-Goettingen

Thu, 2013-01-17 10:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Eleni Katifori

Max Planck Institute - Goettingen

 

The evolution of leaf vasculature: deciphering the design of optimal loopy architectures

 

Host: Douglas Jerolmack (Earth and Environmental Sciences)

Location: 

Lynch Lecture Hall

 

MacDiarmid Medal Lecture - Richard Schrock

Wed, 2012-11-28 16:00
Speaker: 

Richard R. Schrock, MIT

Location: 

Carolyn Hoff Lynch Lecture Hall

2012 Alan G. MacDiarmid Medal Lecture

 

Molybdenum and Tungsten Catalysts for Selective Olefin Metathesis Reactions

NOBCChE Lecture - Malika Jeffries-EL

Fri, 2012-11-09 16:00
Speaker: 

Malika Jeffries-EL

Iowa State University

Location: 

Carolyn Hoff Lynch Lecture Hall

Attached Document: 

 

The 2012 NOBCChE Lectureship at the University of Pennsylvania

 

 

Design and Synthesis of Conjugated Polymers via the Road Less Travelled

Knowledge by the Slice

Fri, 2012-10-26 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Eric J. Schelter

Chemistry Department

 

Title: Sustainability, Renewable Energy and Rare Earth Elements

Location: 

Houston Hall, Golkin Room
3417 Spruce Street

 

What makes an insightful, educational, lunch-time faculty lecture series even more appetizing? Pizza, of course! This semester, the School of Arts and Sciences is serving up a new batch of experts. So sit back, relax and enjoy a unique perspective on some of today’s most exciting research areas. And, most importantly, have a slice on us.

 

For more information, click  here.

Virgil Percec

Photo: 
First Name: 
Virgil
Last Name: 
Percec
Official Title: 
P. Roy Vagelos Professor of Chemistry

Organic, Supramolecular and Macromolecular Chemistry

Contact Information
Office Location: 
4003 IAST, Lab: 4160 IAST
Email: 
percec@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
(215) 573-5527
Fax: 
(215) 573-7888
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • B.S. 1969 Department of Organic and Macromolecular Chemistry, Polytechnic Institute of Jassy, Romania
  • Ph.D. 1976 Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Jassy, Romania
  • Postdoctoral July-August 1981 Hermann Staudinger Hause, University of Freiburg, Germany
  • Postdoctoral September 1981 - March 1982 Institute of Polymer Science, University of Akron, U.S.A.
Research Interests: 

Our research group is involved in the elaboration of synthetic methods, strategies and architectural concepts, as well as in the understanding of the fundamental principles that govern the rational design and synthesis of complex molecular, macromolecular, and supramolecular nonbiological systems that exhibit biological functions. Biological systems are employed as models to develop the synthetic architectural motifs and to control their self-assembly and self-organization during the creation of ordered systems. Our research strikes a balance among a diversity of interrelated disciplines, such as organic, bioorganic, macromolecular, and supramolecular synthesis and catalysis, seeking to understand, mimic, and extend Nature's solutions to the design of synthetic functional nanosystems. 

 

Hierarchical folding, supramolecular chirality, nonbiological ionic and electronic channels and nanowires, nanostructured supramolecular membranes, externally regulated drug release mechanisms, enzyme-like catalytic systems, and self-interrupted organic and macromolecular synthesis are examples of new concepts that are under investigation. Central to the capacity of biological molecules to perform critical functions is their ability to form highly organized and stable 3-D structures using a combination of molecular recognition processes. Therefore, the combinatorial libraries of synthetic building blocks required in our strategies consist of combinations of macrocyclic, dendritic, and other primary sequences that are able to fold into well-defined conformations and also contain all the information required to control and self-repair their secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure at the same level of precision as in biological molecules. To what extent the delicate balance between the structures and functions evolved in Nature during billions of years can be transplanted to synthetic molecules is a fascinating question.

 

Towards these goals, we also develop new synthetic methods for the formation of carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds using metal-catalyzed homo- and cross-coupling, radical, and various ionic and ion-radical reactions. Living and non-statistically self-interrupted polymerization methods are elaborated based on these organic reactions. The design of the internal structure of complex single molecules and the elucidation of the reactivity principles induced by the controlled environment confined within a single molecule or supramolecule are actively pursued. This research involves collaborations with structural and computational chemists and biochemists.

Christopher B. Murray

Photo: 
First Name: 
Christopher B.
Last Name: 
Murray
Official Title: 
Richard Perry University Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering

Nanoscale and Inorganic Materials Chemistry

Contact Information
Office Location: 
347N (Chem 73) & 322 (LRSM) MSE
Email: 
cbmurray@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
(215) 898-0588
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • 1985-1988 B.Sc. Honors Chemistry, Summa cum Laude, St. Mary's University, Halifax N.S., Canada
  • 1989 Rotary International Fellow, University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • 1990-1995 Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • 1995- 2000 Member of research staff, IBM Corp., T. J. Watson Research Center. Established a program in the preparation and characterization of nanomaterials and devices.
  • 2000 - 2006 Manager of the Nanoscale materials and devices department leading development of nanomaterials and exploring self-organizing phenomena for applications in IT.
  • 2007- University of Pennsylvania: Richard Perry University Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering.
Research Interests: 

Our research focuses on Materials Chemistry with full participation in both the departments of Chemistry in the School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) and in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in the School of of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

 

Many collective phenomena in inorganic materials have natural length scales between 1 and 50 nm. Thus size control nanometer sized crystals or "nanocrystals" allows materials properties to be engineered. Nanocrystals display new mesoscopic phenomena found in neither bulk nor molecular systems. For example, the electronic, optical and magnetic properties semiconductors and magnetic nanocrystals strongly depend on crystallite size. Excited by the potential of these nanocrystal materials our mode of operation has been to develop leading synthetic methods and to push the resulting materials toward technology demonstrations. We try to blend the perspective of academic chemistry and materials science with technological perspective that I developed in over a decade of work in industrial research. We hope this mix of influences will help to align opportunities for applications with broader understanding of nanomaterials. Materials chemistry that embraces and harnesses these principles of self-assembly is at the frontier of materials science and become one of its cornerstones within our generation. Key challenges to the advance of this field will be met by advancing synthetic design, improved analytical tools and perhaps through forethought of environmental health and safety issues. Share in efforts to meet these challenges and thus influence the evolution of both materials science and chemistry. 

Other Affiliations: 

Department of Chemistry

231 S. 34 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323

215.898.8317 voice | 215.573.2112 fax | web@chem.upenn.edu

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