Inorganic

YuHuang Wang, U of Maryland; Inorganic Seminar

Tue, 2012-10-02 12:00 - 13:30

Location: Carolyn Hoff Lynch Room

Bradford B. Wayland

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First Name: 
Bradford B.
Last Name: 
Wayland
Official Title: 
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry

Inorganic Chemistry

Contact Information
Office Location: 
Senior Faculty Suite
Email: 
wayland@sas.upenn.edu
Research Interests: 

Metallo-radical and organo-metal substrate reactions are used in both obtaining living radical polymerization for application in block copoymer materials and energy relevant small molecule organometallic transformations.

Our NSF supported polymer program spans areas from transition metal catalyst development and block co-polymer synthesis to materials applications of nano-structured polymer arrays in membranes, sensors, and microelectronic devices. The reactivity of metal-centered radical species and organometallic derivatives are exploited in the control of radical polymerization by catalytic chain transfer and living radical polymerization. Organo-cobalt porphyrin complexes have recently been observed to mediate a highly precise living radical polymerization of acrylate monomers to form low polydispersity homopolymers and block co-polymers. This new approach to obtaining living radical polymerization occurs by a degenerative transfer pathway that involves rapid interchange of polymeric radicals in the polymer with polymeric units in the organo-cobalt porphyrin complexes. This pathway to obtain living radical polymerization is a transition metal form of degenerative transfer that we refer to as radical interchange polymerization (RIP). The expanding capabilities of living radical polymerization to provide new classes of materials required to advance issues that have significant technological relevance are exploited through an active collaboration with materials science and engineering .Two of the issues targeted as focal points for this collaboration are 1) membranes for water purification and 2) low dielectric thin films for advanced micro electric devices. New materials design strategies are determined for each of the central topics along with the requisite approaches for polymer synthesis, morphology, and property evaluation.

The DOE supported energy related research interests are centered on developing new strategies to accomplish thermodynamically and or kinetically challenging reactions such as methane activation and carbon monoxide reductive coupling and hydrogenation. Ligands are designed to achieve high selectivity through steric and electronic constraints on forming the transition states for substrate reactions .The primary focus is on group nine (Co, Rh, Ir) metal complexes where the importance of metallo-radicals is a recurring theme. Metallo-porphyrins, chlorophylls, and related macrocycles are prominent thermal and photocatalysts in biological systems and emerging as important catalyst materials for chemical manufacturing processes. The unique unique chemical and physical properties of metallo-porphyrins and macrocyclic complexes are used in producing thermal and photocatalytic cycles for small molecule reactions. Several important examples include hydrogenation of CO and CO2, activation of methane, oxidation of alkenes, photoreductions and alkene polymerization. Tethered diporphyrin ligands have been designed and synthesized that are used in forming bimetalloradical complexes of Rh(II). Bimetalloradicals provide preorganization of transition states that involve two metalloradicals and give rapid highly selective substrate reactions. Structural, kinetic-mechanistic, thermodynamic, and reactivity studies are used in characterizing intermediates, anticipating new types of reactions, and guiding strategies to produce selective catalyst materials.

Other Affiliations: 

Temple University, Department of Chemistry

Patrick J. Walsh

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First Name: 
Patrick J.
Last Name: 
Walsh
Official Title: 
Professor of Chemistry

Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Chemical Catalysis

Contact Information
Office Location: 
3001 IAST
Email: 
pwalsh@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
(215) 573-2875
Fax: 
(215) 573-6743
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • Advisor Prof. K. Barry Sharpless
  • 1986 B.A. in Chemistry, University of California, San Diego
  • 1991 Ph.D in Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
  • 1991-1994 NSF Postdoctoral Fellow Postdoctoral, The Scripps Research Institute
Research Interests: 

Research in the Walsh group merges the fields of catalysis and organic and inorganic synthesis with the goal of achieving new catalytic asymmetric transformations for the synthesis of chiral building blocks. The transformations we have chosen to study are asymmetric C-C and C-O bond forming reactions, because construction of these bonds lies at the very heart of organic synthesis. We are also interested in the development of tandem reactions that combine several steps in a single reaction vessel. By introducing tandem reactions, we can increase synthetic efficiency while reducing the number of purification steps necessary. 

 

Shown below are examples of tandem reactions developed in the Walsh group:

 

We are also interested in reaction mechanisms, which gives us the opportunity to synthesize some interesting catalysts. Shibasaki's M3(THF)n(BINOLate)3Ln (Ln = lanthanide, M = Li, Na, K) catalyst are among the most efficient known in asymmetric catalysis. We have studied the structure and reactivity of these amazing catalysts, one of which is shown below.4-6 

We are also interested in structural organozinc chemistry. The first example of zinc coordinated to C-C double bond was recently reported from our group.7 

In 2006 the Walsh group crystallographically characterized about 40 compounds, most of which contained metals.

Larry G. Sneddon

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First Name: 
Larry G.
Last Name: 
Sneddon
Official Title: 
Emeritus Professor of Chemistry

Inorganic, Energy and Materials Chemistry

Contact Information
Office Location: 
452 Chem ’73
Email: 
lsneddon@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
(215) 898-8632
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • B.S. Centenary College of Louisiana (1967)
  • Ph.D. Indiana University (1971)
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Virginia (1971-73)
  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1973-74)
Research Interests: 

 

Our research in inorganic chemistry, energy-storage and materials science includes synthetic studies in main-group, transition metal and materials chemistry along with physical and structural investigations of molecular, polymeric, and solid-state materials. Brief overviews of ongoing projects are presented in the following sections.

 

Alternative Energy Carriers: New Chemical Methods for Hydrogen Storage

 

The development of efficient methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. We are exploring the use of chemical hydrides such as ammonia borane and ammonia triborane to store and deliver large amounts of hydrogen through dehydrogenation and/or hydrolysis reactions. As depicted in the example in Figure 1, we have shown that the rate and the extent of hydrogen release from these amineboranes can be significantly increased through the use of metal catalysts, ionic liquids and/or chemical additives. We are continuing to investigate both new methods for the controlled hydrogen release from amineboranes and the development of energy-efficient methods for their regeneration from spent-fuel products.

 

Figure 1. Rhodium catalyzed hydrolysis of ammonia triborane

 

Chemical Precursors to Ultra High Temperature Aerospace Materials

The production of complex structural and electronic materials in useable forms is one of the most challenging problems of modern solid-state chemistry and materials science. Our research in this area is focused on the design, syntheses and applications of new processible molecular and/or polymeric precursors to advanced carbide, nitride and boride ceramics that allow the formation of these technologically important materials in forms that cannot be produced with conventional methods. We are especially interested in ultra high temperature materials, such as HfB2 and ZrB2 based composites, that are potentially important in hypersonic (i.e. flying faster than 5 times the speed of sound) aerospace vehicles (Figure 2). A second part of the project is focused on the formation and properties of micro- and nanostructured ceramics, including fibers, tubes and porous materials.

 

Figure 2. New chemical precursor systems for ultra high temperature hafnium-ceramics that were developed at Penn

 

Transition Metal-Promoted Reactions of Inorganic Compounds

We are developing new general, metal-catalyzed methodologies that enable the systematic, high-yield syntheses of important polyborane compounds and materials. Our goals are both to discover new types of catalytic reactions and to develop an understanding of their fundamental reaction mechanisms and controlling factors.

 

Figure 3. (Left) Metal-catalyzed synthesis of the poly(norbornenyldecaborane) polymer; and (Right) The crystallographically determined structure of a new dendritic decaborane (you can manipulate this molecule online at

 

Ionic Liquid Promoted Reactions

 

Ionic liquids have properties that make them attractive solvents for synthesis, including: negligible vapor pressures, thermal stability to elevated temperatures; the ability to dissolve a range of compounds, salts and gases, immiscibility with many hydrocarbons and/or water thus enabling two-phase reaction systems, weakly-coordinating anions and cations that provide a polar, inert reaction medium, and the ability to stabilize polar intermediates and/or transition states. While ionic liquids have been widely employed for organic synthesis, our recent work showing that decaborane olefin-hydroboration and alkyne-insertion reactions proceed in biphasic ionic-liquid/hydrocarbon solvents without the need of the catalysts required in conventional solvents, was the first demonstration of the unique activating effects of ionic liquids for polyborane syntheses. We are continuing to explore the scope of ionic liquid mediated polyborane reactions along with experimental and computational studies of the mechanisms by which these reactions occur.

 

Inorganometallic Chemistry

Because of the unusual ranges of their accessible charges and coordination geometries, polyboranes can function as versatile ligands that can stabilize transition metals in a much wider array of environments than their organic counterparts, such as the cyclopentadienide anion. We are using integrated synthetic, structural (NMR and X-ray crystallography), electrochemical, and computational (DFT/GIAO) investigations to elucidate the nature of polyborane-metal bonding. The unique properties of metallapolyborane complexes are also being exploited to design new metallocene-like complexes with chemical, optical and/or bioactivity properties of importance to solid-state and/or anticancer applications. 

 

 

Figure 4. (Left) Comparisons of the bonding modes of the cyclopentadienyl and tricarbadecaboranyl ligands; (Right) The crystallographically determined structures of new maganatricarbadecaboranyl complexes illustrating a cage-slippage reaction analogous to a cyclopentadienyl ring-slippage process

Eric J. Schelter

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First Name: 
Eric J.
Last Name: 
Schelter
Official Title: 
Associate Professor of Chemistry

Inorganic and Materials Chemistry

Contact Information
Office Location: 
3003 IAST
Email: 
schelter@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
(215) 898-8633
Fax: 
(215) 573-6743
Twitter: 
@SchelterGroup
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • B.S. Michigan Technological University (1999)
  • Ph.D. Texas A&M University, Advisor: Kim R. Dunbar (2004)
  • Glenn T. Seaborg Postdoctoral Fellow, Los Alamos National Laboratory (2004-2005)
  • Director's Postdoctoral Fellow, Los Alamos National Laboratory (2006)
  • Frederick Reines Postdoctoral Fellow in Experimental Sciences, Los Alamos National Laboratory (2006-2009)
Research Interests: 

 

Projects in the Schelter Group involve inert atmosphere/Schlenk line synthesis of inorganic and organometallic complexes. Rigorous characterization of new compounds is achieved through X-ray crystallography, NMR, FTIR, and UV-Visible absorption spectroscopies, electrochemistry and magnetic susceptibility studies. Current projects are focused on the chemistries and electronic structure effects of the lanthanides, uranium and main group elements

Advanced Rare Earths Separations Chemistry

The rare earth elements: La-Lu, Y and Sc are used in critical renewable energy applications including wind turbine generators and hybrid electric vehicle batteries. These modern applications require pure rare earth elements that must be separated from their composite mineral sources. The Peoples Republic of China currently holds ~97% of the international rare earths market comprising nearly all aspects of the (environmentally taxing) supply chain. To develop other sources of rare earths and reduce the environmental impact of their isolation, there is a clear need for new separations chemistry that reduces the cost of industrial-scale rare earths separations. This project seeks to develop a totally new extractant strategy by harnessing the physicochemical distinctiveness of certain high-value rare earths. New designer rare earth extractants will enable selective separations chemistry for these technologically critical elements.

 

Capturing Heavy-Fermion Type Electron Correlations in Molecular Complexes

The intermetallic heavy-fermion materials, comprising intermediate valence f-elements such as cerium, are characterized by exotic emergent phenomena including unconventional superconductivity. Recent results on these materials suggest a common energy scale for the emergence of the superconducting state, dependent on the local magnetic interaction of f-moments with conduction electrons. Local electron correlations are also believed to underpin the high Tc superconductivity of other families of materials. Parallel studies in molecular chemistry have begun to show inorganic and organometallic complexes are capable of exhibiting the same type of mixed-valency and correlations found in the heavy-fermion materials.

This project will generalize the requirements for emergence of Kondo-like phenomena in magnetically-dilute molecular complexes. New materials will be synthesized from fundamental units of electron correlation to three-dimensional molecular phases.

 

 

 

Exploring the Inverse Trans Influence in the Chemistry of Uranium

Antithetical to the trans influence in transition metal chemistry, which results in a weakening of metal-ligand bonds trans to strongly-bound groups, is the inverse trans influence in the chemistry of the actinides. Semi-core p-orbital mixing with valence d- or f-orbitals gives rise to the influence, however, the presence of both orbital types in the actinide valence shell precludes its simple description. The large thermodynamic stability of the ubiquitous linear, trans-dioxo uranyl cation, UO22+ is one important consequence of this influence.

This project will develop new complexes in varying geometries and coordination environments to systematically study the inverse trans influence in the structural chemistry of uranium. These results will have direct relevance to the bio-remediation of actinide contaminated ground waters, for which the thermodynamic driving force of the influence plays an important role.

Christopher B. Murray

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First Name: 
Christopher B.
Last Name: 
Murray
Official Title: 
Richard Perry University Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering

Nanoscale and Inorganic Materials Chemistry

Contact Information
Office Location: 
347N (Chem 73) & 322 (LRSM) MSE
Email: 
cbmurray@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
(215) 898-0588
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • 1985-1988 B.Sc. Honors Chemistry, Summa cum Laude, St. Mary's University, Halifax N.S., Canada
  • 1989 Rotary International Fellow, University of Auckland, New Zealand
  • 1990-1995 Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
  • 1995- 2000 Member of research staff, IBM Corp., T. J. Watson Research Center. Established a program in the preparation and characterization of nanomaterials and devices.
  • 2000 - 2006 Manager of the Nanoscale materials and devices department leading development of nanomaterials and exploring self-organizing phenomena for applications in IT.
  • 2007- University of Pennsylvania: Richard Perry University Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering.
Research Interests: 

Our research focuses on Materials Chemistry with full participation in both the departments of Chemistry in the School of Arts and Sciences (SAS) and in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering in the School of of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS).

 

Many collective phenomena in inorganic materials have natural length scales between 1 and 50 nm. Thus size control nanometer sized crystals or "nanocrystals" allows materials properties to be engineered. Nanocrystals display new mesoscopic phenomena found in neither bulk nor molecular systems. For example, the electronic, optical and magnetic properties semiconductors and magnetic nanocrystals strongly depend on crystallite size. Excited by the potential of these nanocrystal materials our mode of operation has been to develop leading synthetic methods and to push the resulting materials toward technology demonstrations. We try to blend the perspective of academic chemistry and materials science with technological perspective that I developed in over a decade of work in industrial research. We hope this mix of influences will help to align opportunities for applications with broader understanding of nanomaterials. Materials chemistry that embraces and harnesses these principles of self-assembly is at the frontier of materials science and become one of its cornerstones within our generation. Key challenges to the advance of this field will be met by advancing synthetic design, improved analytical tools and perhaps through forethought of environmental health and safety issues. Share in efforts to meet these challenges and thus influence the evolution of both materials science and chemistry. 

Other Affiliations: 

Ivan J. Dmochowski

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First Name: 
Ivan J.
Last Name: 
Dmochowski
Official Title: 
Professor of Chemistry

Bioinorganic, Bioorganic, Biophysical Chemistry

Additional Titles: 
Undergraduate Chair
Contact Information
Office Location: 
348 N, Lab: 332, 334, 336, 338 N
Email: 
ivandmo@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
215-898-6459
Twitter: 
@DmochowskiUPenn
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • B.A. Harvard College (1994)
  • Research Fellow, Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet, Mainz, DE (1994-1995)
  • Ph.D. California Institute of Technology (2000)
  • Caltech Herbert Newby McCoy Award (2000)
  • Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellow, Biophysics, Caltech (2000-2002)
  • Camille and Henry Dreyfus New Faculty Award (2003)
  • National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2005)
  • Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award (2007)
Research Interests: 

Our lab is developing chemical and biophysical tools to study and manipulate complex biological systems. Projects span many areas of synthetic organic, inorganic, and biophysical chemistry; molecular, cell, and developmental biology; and bioengineering. We are particularly interested in developing new technologies for biomolecular imaging and the fabrication of functional bio-nanomaterials.

Hyperpolarized 129Xe Biosensors for Early Cancer Detection

Molecular imaging technologies hold great promise for early cancer diagnosis and intervention. Our goal is to develop new reagents that extend the capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for monitoring multiple cancer markers simultaneously in vivo. 129Xe has found increasing use for biological imaging applications, due to its biological compatibility (xenon is an anesthetic at high concentrations), hyperpolarizability (this enhances signals 1,000-fold), and high affinity for organic cages such as cryptophanes. The chemical shift of 129Xe varies by a remarkable 200 ppm, depending on its molecular environment: Thus, a 129Xe atom encapsulated inside a cryptophane is a sensitive reporter of perturbations outside the cage. Based on this principle, our lab is generating new biosensors that will identify biomarkers associated with cancers of the breast, lungs, brain, and pancreas. The long-range goal of this project is to use MRI to detect aberrant proteins that cause cancer in humans, years before the formation of a tumor.

Ferritin Templates for Nanoparticle Synthesis and Assembly

The goal of this project is to use ferritin proteins as templates for synthesizing and assembling inorganic nanoparticles with nanometer precision. Ferritins contain 24 four-helix bundle subunits that self-assemble to create a large central cavity. We have made water-stable, 10-12-nm gold and silver nanoparticles inside ferritin (gray sphere). Particles are fully characterized using facilities at the UPenn Laboratory for Research on the Structure of Matter (LRSM). We are functionalizing the surface of these ferritin-metal nanoparticles for sensing and nano/biomaterials applications. We are also performing computational protein design, in collaboration with the Saven lab, to mutate residues inside the ferritin cavity to enhance their metal-binding properties. Methods for organizing ferritin metal nanoparticles in 2- and 3-dimensions are being developed, in order to build very small conducting circuits. 

Laser-Activated Chemical Biology: Controlling Genes with Light

The goal of this project is to develop methods for turning genes "on" and "off" with light inside neurons and developing zebrafish embryos with high spatial and temporal control. As a first step, we have developed methods for incorporating a photoactive blocking group in the middle of a DNA or RNA oligonucleotide. In one application, we modulated primer extension by DNA polymerase (KF) using UV light. Photoactivation was monitored using a fluorescent reporter. We are now developing methods to control protein translation by the ribosome using similarly caged RNA. Blocking groups mask the messenger RNA start codon, and are designed to prevent translation until photocleavage. We will control complex gradients of proteins involved in cell signaling during zebrafish development and wound healing, using a state-of-the-art UV confocal microscope in the lab.

Selected Publications: 

 

X. Tang, J. Swaminathin, A.M. Gewirtz, I.J. Dmochowski, Regulating gene expression in human leukemia cells using light-activated oligodeoxynucleotides, Nucl. Acids Res. (36) 559-569, 2008.

 

J.A. Aaron, J.M. Chambers, K.M. Jude, L. Di Costanzo, I.J. Dmochowski, D.W. Christianson, Structure of a 129Xe-cryptophane biosensor complexed with human carbonic anhydrase II, J. Am. Chem. Soc. (130) 6942-6943, 2008.

 

G.K. Seward, Q. Wei, I.J. Dmochowski, Peptide-mediated cellular uptake of cryptophane, Bioconjug. Chem. (19) 2129-2135, 2008.

 

J.L. Richards, X. Tang, A. Turetsky, I.J. Dmochowski, RNA bandages for photomodulating in vitro protein synthesis, Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. (18) 6255-6258, 2008.

 

C. Butts, J. Swift, S.-G. Kang, L. Di Costanzo, D.W. Christianson, J.G. Saven, I.J. Dmochowski, Directing noble metal ion chemistry within a designed ferritin protein, Biochemistry (47) 12729-12739, 2008.

 

J.L. Chambers, P.A. Hill, J.A. Aaron, Z. Han, D.W. Christianson, N.N. Kuzma, I.J. Dmochowski, Cryptophane xenon-129 nuclear magnetic resonance biosensors targeting human carbonic anhydrase, J. Am. Chem. Soc. (131) 563-569, 2009.

 

P.A. Hill, Q. Wei, T. Troxler, I.J. Dmochowski, Substituent effects on xenon binding affinity and solution behavior of water-soluble cryptophanes, J. Am. Chem. Soc. (131) 3069-3077, 2009.

 

G.P. Robbins, M. Jimbo, J. Swift, M.J. Therien, D.A. Hammer, I.J. Dmochowski, Photo-initiated destruction of composite porphyrin-protein polymersomes, J. Am. Chem. Soc., (131) 3872-3874, 2009. 

 

J. Swift, C. Butts, J. Cheung-Lau, V. Yerubandi, I.J. Dmochowski, Efficient self-assembly of Archaeoglobus fulgidus ferritin around metallic cores, Langmuir, (25) 5219-5225, 2009.

 

C.A. Butts, J. Xi, G. Brannigan, M.L. Klein, R.G. Eckenhoff, I.J. Dmochowski, Identification of a fluorescent general anesthetic, 1-aminoanthracene, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. (106) 6501-6506, 2009.

 

I.J. Dmochowski, Xenon out of its shell, Nature Chemistry, ‘In Your Element’ invited feature article, vol. 1, 250, June 2009.

 

O. Taratula, I.J. Dmochowski, Functionalized 129Xe contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. (14) 97-104, 2010.

 

J.L. Richards, G.K. Seward, Y. Huang, I.J. Dmochowski, Turning DNAzymes on and off with light, ChemBioChem (11) 320-324, 2010.

 

J. Lampe, Z. Liao, I.J. Dmochowski, P.S. Ayyaswamy, D.M. Eckmann, Imaging macromolecular interactions at an interface, Langmuir (26) 2452-2459, 2010.

Courses Taught: 
  • Chemistry 101, "General Chemistry"
  • Chemistry 559, "Biomolecular Imaging"
  • Chemistry 567, “Bioinorganic Chemistry”

Donald H. Berry

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First Name: 
Donald H.
Last Name: 
Berry
Official Title: 
Professor of Chemistry

Inorganic and Organometallic Chemistry

Research Statement

Our research group is concerned with synthesis, structure and mechanism in inorganic and organometallic systems. We are interested in the preparation and study of new organometallic compounds which pose significant questions of structure and bonding, or which are designed to exhibit unusual reactivity in chemical transformations. We are also developing new synthetic routes to inorganic and organometallic polymers. General areas of interest are described below:

 

Contact Information
Office Location: 
554 N
Email: 
berry@sas.upenn.edu
Phone: 
(215) 898-2705
Admin Support: 
Education: 
  • S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1979)
  • Ph.D. California Institute of Technology (1984)
  • Research Associate, University of Rochester (1985)
  • Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow (1990)
  • Chair, Chemistry Undergraduate Committee (2000- )
Selected Publications: 

 

"Evidence for Ligand Non-Innocence in a Formally Ruthenium(I) Hydride Complex," Noah L. Wieder, Michelle Gallagher, Patrick J. Carroll, and Donald H. Berry* J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 4107-4109.

 

"Low-Valent Ruthenium Complexes of the Non-innocent 2,6-Bis(imino)pyridine Ligand" Michelle Gallagher, Noah L. Wieder, Vladimir K. Dioumaev, Patrick J. Carroll, and Donald H. Berry* Organometallics, 2010, 29,591-603.

 

D. A. Ruddy, D. H. Berry, and C. Nataro, “Synthesis and characterization of 1-methyl-1-silaindane and 1-methyl-1-germaindane,” J. Organomet. Chem. 2008, 693, 169-172.

 

H. Yoo, P. J. Carroll, and D. H. Berry, “Synthesis and Structure of Ruthenium-Silylene Complexes: Activation of Si-Cl Bonds in N-Heterocyclic Silanes,” J. Amer. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 6038-6039. 

 

Y. Huo and D. H. Berry, "Synthesis and Properties of Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Materials Containing Covalently Bonded Luminescent Polygermanes," Chem. Mat., 2005, 17, 157-163.

 

B. Arkles, Y. Pan, G.L. Larson, and D. H. Berry, "Cyclic Azasilanes: Volatile Coupling Agents for Nanotechnology," Silanes and Other Coupling Agents, Vol 3, K.L. Mittal, ed. 2004,.

 

V. K. Dioumaev, L. J. Procopio, P. J. Carroll, and D. H. Berry, "Synthesis and Reactivity of Silyl Ruthenium Complexes: The Importance of Trans Effects in C-H Activation, Si-C Bond Formation, and Dehydrogenative Coupling of Silanes," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 8043-8058.

 

V. K. Dioumaev, B. R. Yoo, P. J. Carroll, and D. H. Berry "Structure and Reactivity of Bis(Silyl) Dihydride Complexes (PMe3)3Ru(SiR3)2H2: Model Compounds and Real Intermediates in a Dehydrogenative C-Si Bond Forming Reactions," J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2003, 125, 8936-8948.

 

V. K. Dioumaev, P. J. Carroll, and D. H. Berry "Tandem ?-CH Activation / SiH Elimination Reactions: Stabilization of CH Activation Products by beta-Agostic SiH Interactions, " Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 2003, 42, 3947-3949.

 

M. Motonaga, H. Nakashima, S. M. Katz, D. H. Berry, T. Imase, S. Kawauchi, M. Fujiki, and J. R. Koe, "The First Optically Active Polygermanes: Preferential Screw Sense Helicity of Enantiopure Chiral-substituted Aryl Polygermanes and Comparison with Analogous Polysilanes," J. Organomet. Chem. 2003, 685, 44-50.

 

K. A. Ezbiansky, D. H. Berry, B. Arkles, and R. J. Composto, Fluoride-Catalyzed Conversion of b-AcetoxyEthyl-Silsesquioxane: a Chloride-Free Pre-cursor for Silica Films", Polym. Prepr., 2001, 42, 101-102.

 

K. A. Ezbiansky, B. Arkles, R. J. Composto, and D. H. Berry, "b-Acetoxyethyl Silsesquioxanes: Chloride-Free Pre-cursors For SiO2 Films Via Staged Hydrolysis," Mater. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., 2000, 606, 251-256.

 

V. K. Dioumaev, K. Plössl, P. J. Carroll, and D. H. Berry, "Access to Unsaturated Ruthenium Complexes via Phosphine Complexation with Triphenylborane; Synthesis and Structure of a Zwitterionic Arene Complex, (h6-Ph-BPh2H) Ru(PMe3)2(SiMe3).", Organometallics, 2000, 19, 3374-3378.

 

V. K. Dioumaev, K. Plössl, and D. H. Berry, "Formation and Interconversion of Ruthenium-Silene and 16-Electron Ruthenium Silyl Complexes," J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1999, 121, 8391-8392.

 

J. A. Reichl and D. H. Berry "Recent Progress in Transition Metal-Catalyzed Reactions of the Silicon, Germanium, and Tin," Adv. in Organomet. Chem., 1999, 43, 197-265.

 

K. A. Ezbiansky, P. I. Djurovich, M. LaForest, D. J. Sinning, R. Zayes, and D. H. Berry, "Catalytic C-H Bond Functionalization: Synthesis of Aryl-silanes by Dehydrogenative Transfer Coupling of Arenes and Triethylsilane," Organometallics, 1998, 17, 1455-1457.

 

S. M. Katz, J. A. Reichl, and D. H. Berry, "Catalytic Synthesis of Poly-(arylmethylgermanes) by Demethanative Coupling: A Mild Route to s-Conjugated Polymers," J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1998, 120, 9844-9855.

 

L. J. Procopio, P. J. Carroll, and D. H. Berry, "Structure and Reactivity of Cp2Zr(h2-Me2Si=NtBu)(CO): An Unusual Silanimine Carbonyl Complex with Extensive s-p* Back-Bonding," Polyhedron, 1995, 14, 45-55.

Department of Chemistry

231 S. 34 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323

215.898.8317 voice | 215.573.2112 fax | web@chem.upenn.edu

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