Inorganic

Inorganic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Laura Gagliardi, University of Minnesota

Tue, 2019-02-12 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Laura Gagliardi

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Tomson

Title & Abstract TBA

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

RESCHEDULED: Inorganic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Markus Ribbe, UCI

Tue, 2018-09-18 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Markus Ribble

Seminar Rescheduled 5/7/2019

 

"Nitrogenase M-Cluster Assembly:"


"Tracing the ‘9th Sulfur’ of the Nitrogenase Cofactor via a Semi-Synthetic Approach"

"The  M-cluster  is  the  active  site  of  nitrogenase  that  contains  an  8Fe-core  assembled  via coupling and rearrangement  of  two [Fe4S4]  clusters  concomitant  with  the  insertion  of  an interstitial carbon and a ‘9th  sulfur’. Combining synthetic [Fe4S4] clusters with an assembly protein template, we show that sulfite gives rise to the ‘9th sulfur’ that is incorporated in the catalytically important belt region of the cofactor after the radical SAM-dependent carbide insertion and the concurrent 8Fe-core rearrangement have already taken place. This work provides a semi-synthetic tool for strategically labeling the cofactor—including its ‘9th  S’ in the belt region—for mechanistic investigations of nitrogenase while suggesting an interesting"
"link between nitrogen fixation and sulfite detoxification in diazotrophic organisms."

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Attached Document: 

Host: Dr. Tomson

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Inorganic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Smaranda Marinescu, John Hopkins

Thu, 2018-09-13 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 
Dr. Smaranda Marinescu
Bio-Inspired Coordination Complexes and Polymers for Energy Applications

Research in the Marinescu group focuses on fundamental research to understand, design, and synthesize novel catalytic systems essential to the development of efficient solar-to-fuel technologies. Inspired by biological systems, we innovate molecular catalysts that involve hydrogen bonding networks capable of small molecule activation, and multiple proton and electron transfers. We have shown that cobalt complexes with pendant proton relays (NH groups) act as highly efficient catalysts for the reduction of CO2 to CO, and that the presence of the pendant NH moiety is crucial for catalysis.

 

 

 

We also explore the immobilization of metal complexes to electrodes as a method to combine homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as a promising class of materials; however, the insulating nature of MOFs has limited their application as electrocatalysts. We have shown that metal dithiolene units can be successfully integrated into one- and two-dimensional (1D/2D) frameworks. The generated coordination polymers display unique electronic properties – they catalyze with remarkable activity the electrocatalytic conversion of water into hydrogen, and their electrical conductivity is among that of the best coordination polymers. We expect the design principles discovered in these studies to have a profound impact towards the development of advanced materials and sustainable technologies.

 

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lectrue Hall

Chemistry Complex

 Host: Dr. Schelter

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Inorganic Chemistry Seminar: Dr. Yunho Lee, KAIST

Tue, 2018-08-14 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 

Dr. Yunho Lee

Coordination Chemistry of 1st-row Transition Metal Pincer Complexes

 Transition metal adduct formations with small molecules such as N2, H2, CO and CO2 are drawing much attention due to their importance in developing synthetic catalysts for various industrial processes. In our laboratory, a series of such species with low-valent 1st row transition metals are currently under investigation. This effort is to show their respective roles in small-molecule transformations that include the COx and NOx (x = 1 – 3) conversions for modeling ACS/CODH active site chemistry and biological denitrification processes, respectively. In this presentation, a particular study with pincer complexes (PEP)M-L (E = N, P or Si and M = Co, Ni, Cu), where the L site is occupied by various ligands such as NHR2, N2, COx and COOR will be discussed. Regarding the geometry and reactivity relationship, a (PPP)M scaffold reveals the interconversion between square planar and tetrahedral geometry in which reversible group transfer occurs between a phosphide moiety and a nickel ion via unanticipated metal-ligand cooperation. This unusual group transfer reaction is tightly coupled with metal’s local geometry and its 0/I/II redox couples. In contrast, a (PNP)M scaffold shows a selective reaction pattern occurring at the structurally rigidified nickel center. With a structurally rigidified acriPNP ligand, a T-shaped nickel(I) metalloradical species was successfully stabilized. Having a sterically exposed half-filled dx2-y2 orbital, this nickel(I) species reveals unique open-shell reactivity. Such modification is successful in selective conversion of CO2. The reduction of {(acriPNP)Ni(CO)}{BF4} also succeeded in generating mono- and zero-valent nickel carbonyl complexes. In fact, the Ni(0)-CO species reveals the selective addition of CO2 to give a nickel(II)-carboxylate species with the expulsion of CO. The closed synthetic cycle for CO2 reduction to CO was finally established with a (acriPNP)Ni system.

 


·       “Selective Transformation of CO2 to CO at a Single Nickel Center” Acc. Chem. Res., 2018, 51, 1144-1152.

·       “Direct CO2 addition to a Ni(0)-CO species allowing the selective generation of a nickel(II) carboxylate with expulsion of CO” J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2018, 140, 2179-2185.

·       “A T-Shaped Ni(I) Metalloradical Species” Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2017, 56, 9502.

·       “Carbon Dioxide Binding at a Ni/Fe Center; Synthesis and Characterization of Ni(η1-CO2-κC) and Ni-μ-CO2-κC:κ2O,O’-Fe” Chem. Sci. 2017, 8, 600.

·       “Phosphinite-Ni0 Mediated Formation of a Phosphide-NiII-OCOOMe Species via Uncommon Metal-Ligand Cooperation.” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 4280.

Location: 

Carol Lynch Lecture Hall

Chemistry Complex

Host: Dr. Mindiola

inquiries rvargas@sas.upenn.edu

Inorganic Chemistry Seminar, Dr. Nathaniel Szymczak, University of Michigan

Tue, 2018-05-01 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 
Host: Tomson
Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall
Attached Document: 

Moving Beyond the Metal: Assisted Small Molecule Activation

 

6th Philadelphia Inorganic Colloquium (PIC-6)

Sat, 2018-04-07 09:00 - 17:00
Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall

The 6th Philadelphia Inorganic Colloquium (PIC-6) will be held at Penn Chemistry this Saturday, April 7, 2018. We would like to encourage members from the Penn Chemistry community to attend. PIC-6 will be free for attendees and the poster session will be open to all local researchers.

 

Late registration is welcome.

 

Schedule of Events

 

Hirschmann Visiting Professor (Chad Mirkin, Northwestern): Lecture 3

Fri, 2018-04-13 12:00 - 13:00
Speaker: 
Prof. Chad Mirkin, Northwestern University
Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall
Attached Document: 

Lecture 3: Expanding the Materials Genome with Nanocombinatorics

 

Hirschmann Visiting Professor (Chad Mirkin, Northwestern): Lecture 2

Wed, 2018-04-11 13:00 - 14:00
Speaker: 
Prof. Chad Mirkin, Northwestern University
Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall
Attached Document: 

Lecture 2: Spherical Nucleic Acids: Empowering the Digital Drug Design Revolution

 

Hirschmann Visiting Professor (Chad Mirkin, Northwestern): Lecture 1

Tue, 2018-04-10 16:00 - 17:00
Speaker: 
Chad Mirkin, Northwestern
Location: 
Lynch Lecture Hall
Attached Document: 

Lecture 1: Colloidal Crystal Engineering with DNA: Creating a Genetic Code for Materials Design 

 

Organic Chemistry Seminar, Dr. Jon Njardarson( Univeristy of Arizona)

Mon, 2018-04-02 00:00 - 01:00
Speaker: 
Host: Smith
Location: 
Carol Lynch Lecture Hall Chemistry Complex
Title: No Strain no Gain 

Department of Chemistry

231 S. 34 Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323

215.898.8317 voice | 215.573.2112 fax | web@chem.upenn.edu

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